Vintage photos | the tools and handicrafts | Norway

Old objects tell stories, silent stories about a time gone by.
LA Dahlmann | talk NORWAY
Old Norwegian coffee grinder. The Norwegian word is «kaffekvern» - or in local Telemark dialect: «kvenn». | Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum - digitaltmuseum.no KVB.0088 - cc by-sa.

In days of yore, one could wake up and really smell the coffee.

Old Norwegian coffee grinder. The Norwegian word is «kaffekvern» – or in local Telemark dialect: «kvenn».

Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum – digitaltmuseum.no KVB.0088 – cc by-sa.

A simple Norwegian floor sweeper made of sticks

A simple Norwegian floor sweeper made of sticks. | Photo: Roger Berg - digitalmuseum.no SA.04148 - CC BY-SA.

Photo: Roger Berg – digitalmuseum.no SA.04148 – CC BY-SA.

The grindstone was a vital tool on the old Norwegian farm

Otto Horndal sharpens his scythe on the old grindstone. The name of the man pulling the crank handle is not known. The location is Horndalen, Elverum, Hedmark, Norway – and the year is 1958.

If you ever visit a Norwegian farm, ask to be shown where the grindstone is. A surprisingly large number of farms still have the grindstone tucked away somewhere – or even displayed in a prominent place. For many, it is a symbol of the old farming way of life – evoking childhood memories and emotions.

Otto Horndal sharpens his scythe on the old grindstone. The name of the man pulling the crank handle is not known. The location is Horndalen, Elverum, Hedmark, Norway - and the year is 1958. If you ever visit a Norwegian farm, ask to be shown where the grindstone is. A surprisingly large number of farms would still have the grindstone tucked away somewhere. | Photo: Dagfinn Grønoset Glomdalsmuseet - digitaltmuseum.no DGS.2971 - cc by-sa.

Photo: Dagfinn Grønoset Glomdalsmuseet – digitaltmuseum.no DGS.2971 – cc by-sa.

Beautiful craftsmanship

A handmade wooden bucket – from Dale, Fjaler, Sunnfjord, Sogn og Fjordane, Norway.

A handmade wooden bucket - from Dale, Fjaler, Sunnfjord, Sogn og Fjordane, Norway. | Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt - digitaltmuseum.no NFL.11114 - cc by-sa.

Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt – digitaltmuseum.no NFL.11114 – cc by-sa.

An old plough

An old Norwegian plough made of wood and iron. 85 cm tall – and 106 cm long. Used with a horse. From Hopland, Utvik, Stryn, Sogn og Fjordane.

An old Norwegian plough made of wood and iron. 85 cm tall - and 106 cm long. Used with a horse. From Hopland, Utvik, Stryn, Sogn og Fjordane. | Photo: Nordfjord Folkemuseum - digitaltmuseum.no NFM.0000-00985 - cc by-sa.

Photo: Nordfjord Folkemuseum – digitaltmuseum.no NFM.0000-00985 – cc by-sa.

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My Norwegian heritage

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The Stone age people were master hunters, fishers, and gatherers. The lived with the seasons and followed the prey.
After a troubled ten-year courtship, the current King Harald V of Norway finally got to marry his Miss Sonja Haraldsen on the 29th of August 1968.
17 May 1814 is regarded as the birth of the modern-day Norwegian state. But it took almost another hundred years before the Norwegians could declare complete independence.
10 July is the feast day of Saint Knut - Knutsok - and marks the beginning of the haymaking season - høyonna - in the old Norwegian farming calendar.
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A photo is a snapshot of history - and a story and a history lesson in itself.
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