Vintage photos | the tools and handicrafts | Norway

Old objects tell stories, silent stories about a time gone by.
LA Dahlmann | talk NORWAY
Old Norwegian coffee grinder. The Norwegian word is «kaffekvern» - or in local Telemark dialect: «kvenn». | Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum - digitaltmuseum.no KVB.0088 - cc by-sa.

In days of yore, one could wake up and really smell the coffee.

Old Norwegian coffee grinder. The Norwegian word is «kaffekvern» – or in local Telemark dialect: «kvenn».

Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum – digitaltmuseum.no KVB.0088 – cc by-sa.

A simple Norwegian floor sweeper made of sticks

A simple Norwegian floor sweeper made of sticks. | Photo: Roger Berg - digitalmuseum.no SA.04148 - CC BY-SA.

Photo: Roger Berg – digitalmuseum.no SA.04148 – CC BY-SA.

The grindstone was a vital tool on the old Norwegian farm

Otto Horndal sharpens his scythe on the old grindstone. The name of the man pulling the crank handle is not known. The location is Horndalen, Elverum, Hedmark, Norway – and the year is 1958.

If you ever visit a Norwegian farm, ask to be shown where the grindstone is. A surprisingly large number of farms still have the grindstone tucked away somewhere – or even displayed in a prominent place. For many, it is a symbol of the old farming way of life – evoking childhood memories and emotions.

Otto Horndal sharpens his scythe on the old grindstone. The name of the man pulling the crank handle is not known. The location is Horndalen, Elverum, Hedmark, Norway - and the year is 1958. If you ever visit a Norwegian farm, ask to be shown where the grindstone is. A surprisingly large number of farms would still have the grindstone tucked away somewhere. | Photo: Dagfinn Grønoset Glomdalsmuseet - digitaltmuseum.no DGS.2971 - cc by-sa.

Photo: Dagfinn Grønoset Glomdalsmuseet – digitaltmuseum.no DGS.2971 – cc by-sa.

Beautiful craftsmanship

A handmade wooden bucket – from Dale, Fjaler, Sunnfjord, Sogn og Fjordane, Norway.

A handmade wooden bucket - from Dale, Fjaler, Sunnfjord, Sogn og Fjordane, Norway. | Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt - digitaltmuseum.no NFL.11114 - cc by-sa.

Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt – digitaltmuseum.no NFL.11114 – cc by-sa.

An old plough

An old Norwegian plough made of wood and iron. 85 cm tall – and 106 cm long. Used with a horse. From Hopland, Utvik, Stryn, Sogn og Fjordane.

An old Norwegian plough made of wood and iron. 85 cm tall - and 106 cm long. Used with a horse. From Hopland, Utvik, Stryn, Sogn og Fjordane. | Photo: Nordfjord Folkemuseum - digitaltmuseum.no NFM.0000-00985 - cc by-sa.

Photo: Nordfjord Folkemuseum – digitaltmuseum.no NFM.0000-00985 – cc by-sa.

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Norwegian history