Vintage photos | the stave churches | Norway

Some of the beautiful Norwegian wooden stave churches are almost 1000 years old. Today, there are 28 of them left.
LA Dahlmann | talk NORWAY
Borgund stave church in Lærdal, Sogn og Fjordane, Norway. Built sometime between 1180 and 1250 AD. | Photo: Oliver Webb - adobe stock - copyrighted.
The Borgund stave church in Lærdal, Sogn og Fjordane. Built sometime between 1180 and 1250 AD. | © Oliver Webb - stock.adobe.com.

Interior from Torpo stave church in Ål, Buskerud, Norway

Interior from Torpo stave church in Ål, Buskerud, Norway. Estimated built around 1160. | Photo: Teigen - kulturminnebilder.ra.no T058_01_0084 - Public domain.

Interior from Torpo stave church in Ål, Buskerud, Norway. Estimated built around 1160. | Photo: Teigen – kulturminnebilder.ra.no T058_01_0084 – Public domain.

Rollag stave church in Rollag, Buskerud, Norway

Rollag stave church in Rollag, Buskerud, Norway. Sections estimated built in late 1200s. | Photo: Dagfinn Rasmussen - kulturminnebilder.ra.no Rollag_169_DSC5291_DxO - CC BY.

Rollag stave church in Rollag, Buskerud, Norway. Sections estimated built in late 1200s. | Photo: Dagfinn Rasmussen – kulturminnebilder.ra.no Rollag_169_DSC5291_DxO – CC BY.

Rødven stave church in Rauma, Møre og Romsdal, Norway

Rødven stave church in Rauma, Møre og Romsdal, Norway. Estimated built around 1300, but contains older elements. | Photo: Karin Axelsen - kulturminnebilder.ra.no T328_01_0400 - CC BY.

Rødven stave church in Rauma, Møre og Romsdal, Norway. Estimated built around 1300, but contains older elements. | Photo: Karin Axelsen – kulturminnebilder.ra.no T328_01_0400 – CC BY.

Urnes stave church in Luster, Sogn og Fjordane, Norway

Urnes stave church in Luster, Sogn og Fjordane, Norway. Estimated built around 1140. | Photo: Harald Ibenholt - kulturminnebilder.ra.no T284_01_0787 - CC BY.

Urnes stave church in Luster, Sogn og Fjordane, Norway. Estimated built around 1140. | Photo: Harald Ibenholt – kulturminnebilder.ra.no T284_01_0787 – CC BY.

Lom stave church in Lom, Oppland, Norway

Lom stave church in Lom, Oppland, Norway. Estimated built in the second half of the 1100s. | Photo: Dagfinn Rasmussen - kulturminnebilder.ra.no Lom_DSC7862 - CC BY.

Lom stave church in Lom, Oppland, Norway. Estimated built in the second half of the 1100s. | Photo: Dagfinn Rasmussen – kulturminnebilder.ra.no Lom_DSC7862 – CC BY.

Heddal stave church in Notodden, Telemark, Norway

Heddal stave church in Notodden, Telemark, Norway. Estimated built in the first half of the 1200s. | Photo: Dagfinn Rasmussen - kulturminnebilder.ra.no Heddal_stor_DSC7340 - CC BY.

Heddal stave church in Notodden, Telemark, Norway. Estimated built in the first half of the 1200s. | Photo: Dagfinn Rasmussen – kulturminnebilder.ra.no Heddal_stor_DSC7340 – CC BY.

Ringebu stave church in Ringebu, Oppland, Norway

Ringebu stave church in Ringebu, Oppland, Norway. Estimated built around 1220. | Photo: Dagfinn Rasmussen - kulturminnebilder.ra.no Ringebu_DSC2944 - CC BY.

Ringebu stave church in Ringebu, Oppland, Norway. Estimated built around 1220. | Photo: Dagfinn Rasmussen – kulturminnebilder.ra.no Ringebu_DSC2944 – CC BY.

Interior from Kaupanger stave church in Sogndal, Sogn og Fjordane, Norway

Interior from Kaupanger stave church in Sogndal, Sogn og Fjordane, Norway. Estimated built around 1137. | Photo: Unknown - kulturminnebilder.ra.no T287_01_0002 - CC BY.

Interior from Kaupanger stave church in Sogndal, Sogn og Fjordane, Norway. Estimated built around 1137. | Photo: Unknown – kulturminnebilder.ra.no T287_01_0002 – CC BY.

Hopperstad (Hoprekstad) stave church in Vik, Sogn og Fjordane, Norway

Hopperstad (Hoprekstad) stave church in Vik, Sogn og Fjordane, Norway. Estimated built around 1130. | Photo: Ragnhild Hoel - kulturminnebilder.ra.no T291_01_0161 - CC BY.

Hopperstad (Hoprekstad) stave church in Vik, Sogn og Fjordane, Norway. Estimated built around 1130. | Photo: Ragnhild Hoel – kulturminnebilder.ra.no T291_01_0161 – CC BY.

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Norway | wooden buildings one thousand years old

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