Vintage photos | the rose painted chests | Norway

The rose painted chests of Norway - a treasure that will live for centuries to come.
LA Dahlmann | talk NORWAY
Chest from 1697. Restoration work performed 1815 - probably by the artist Olav Hansson (1750-1820). | Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt - Norsk Folkemuseum NF.1917-0171 - CC BY-SA.
Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt – Norsk Folkemuseum NF.1917-0171 – CC BY-SA.

1. Chest from 1697

The chest above is from 1697. Restoration work performed 1815 – probably by the artist Olav Hansson (1750-1820). From Numedal, Buskerud. Kept at the Norsk Folkemuseum, Oslo.

2. Teigland, Hjartdal, Telemark

Norwegian rose painted – rosemalt – chest from Teigland, Hjartdal, Telemark. The assumed artist is Hans Olavson Glittenberg. The inscription year is 1826. Kept at the Vest-Telemark Museum, Telemark.

Norwegian rose painted - rosemalt - chest from Teigland, Hjartdal, Telemark. Assumed artist is Hans Olavson Glittenberg. Inscription year 1826. Kept at Vest-Telemark Museum, Telemark. | Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum - digitaltmuseum.no LB.00227 - CC BY-SA.

Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum – digitaltmuseum.no LB.00227 – CC BY-SA.

3. Gransherad, Telemark

Norwegian rose painted – rosemalt – chest from Gransherad, Telemark. The assumed artist is Olav Busnes. The inscription year is 1820. Kept at the Vest-Telemark Museum, Telemark.

Norwegian rose painted - rosemalt - chest from Gransherad, Telemark. Assumed artist is Olav Busnes. Inscription year 1820. Kept at Vest-Telemark Museum, Telemark. | Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum - digitaltmuseum.no MLA.212 - CC BY-SA.

Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum – digitaltmuseum.no MLA.212 – CC BY-SA.

4. Ørskog, Sunnmøre, Møre og Romsdal

Norwegian rose painted – rosemalt – chest from Ørskog, Sunnmøre, Møre og Romsdal. Artist is Luchas Nielsen Gram. Woodcarving by Eliasmesteren. Inscription: Karen M. Pedersdatter / Meelseth 1835. Kept at the Norsk Folkemuseum, Oslo.

Norwegian rose painted - rosemalt - chest from Ørskog, Sunnmøre, Møre og Romsdal. Artist is Luchas Nielsen Gram. Woodcarving by Eliasmesteren. Inscription: Karen M. Pedersdatter / Meelseth 1835. Kept at Norsk Folkemuseum, Oslo. | Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt - digitaltmuseum.no NF.1895-0499 - CC BY-SA.

Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt – digitaltmuseum.no NF.1895-0499 – CC BY-SA.

5. Chest from 1703

Norwegian rose painted – rosemalt – chest. Artist and original location unknown. The inscription years are 1703 and 1784. Kept at the Norsk Folkemuseum, Oslo.

Norwegian rose painted - rosemalt - chest. Artist and original location unknown. Inscription years 1703 and 1784. Kept at Norsk Folkemuseum, Oslo. | Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt - digitaltmuseum.no NF.1901-0211 - CC BY-SA.

Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt – digitaltmuseum.no NF.1901-0211 – CC BY-SA.

6. Chest from 1831

Rose painted – rosemalt – chest. Kept at the Larvik Museum, Vestfold. Artist unknown. The inscription year is 1831.

Norwegian rose painted - rosemalt - chest. Artist and original location unknown. Inscription year 1831. Kept at Larvik Museum, Vestfold. | Photo: Mekonnen Wolday - digitaltmuseum.no HL.00929 - CC BY-SA.

Photo: Mekonnen Wolday – digitaltmuseum.no HL.00929 – CC BY-SA

7. Fjotland, Kvinesdal, Agder

Norwegian rose painted – rosemalt – chest from Fjotland, Kvinesdal, Agder. Artist is Gutorm Persson Eftestøl. The inscription year is 1869. Kept at the Norsk Folkemuseum, Oslo.

Norwegian rose painted - rosemalt - chest from Fjotland, Kvinesdal, Agder. Artist is Gutorm Persson Eftestøl. Inscription year 1869. Kept at Norsk Folkemuseum, Oslo. | Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt - digitaltmuseum.no NF.1921-2016 - CC BY-SA.

Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt – digitaltmuseum.no NF.1921-2016 – CC BY-SA.

8. Åseral, Agder

Norwegian rose painted – rosemalt – chest from Åseral, Agder. Artist unknown. The inscription year is 1819. Kept at the Norsk Folkemuseum, Oslo.

Norwegian rose painted - rosemalt - chest from Åseral, Agder. Artist unknown. Inscription year 1819. Kept at Norsk Folkemuseum, Oslo. | Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt - digitaltmuseum.no NF.1922-0539 - CC BY-SA.

Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt – digitaltmuseum.no NF.1922-0539 – CC BY-SA.

9. Fjotland, Kvinesdal, Agder

Norwegian rose painted – rosemalt – chest from Fjotland, Kvinesdal, Agder. Belonged to Borel Jarkobson Lindeland. Artist unknown. The inscription year is 1829. Kept at the Norsk Folkemuseum, Oslo.

Norwegian rose painted - rosemalt - chest from Fjotland, Kvinesdal, Agder. Belonged to Borel Jarkobson Lindeland. Artist unknown. Inscription year 1829. Kept at Norsk Folkemuseum, Oslo. | Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt - digitaltmuseum.no NF.1922-1668 - CC BY-SA.

Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt – digitaltmuseum.no NF.1922-1668 – CC BY-SA.

10. Åseral, Agder

Norwegian rose painted – rosemalt – chest from Åseral, Agder. The assumed artist is Aslak Kolbeinsson Haaland. The inscription year is 1797. Kept at the Norsk Folkemuseum, Oslo.

Norwegian rose painted - rosemalt - chest from Åseral, Agder. Assumed artist is Aslak Kolbeinsson Haaland. Inscription year 1797. Kept at Norsk Folkemuseum, Oslo. | Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt - digitaltmuseum.no NF.1919-0867 - CC BY-SA.

Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt – digitaltmuseum.no NF.1919-0867 – CC BY-SA.

Our most recent posts

My Norwegian heritage

The Fjord horse is one of today’s oldest and purest horse breeds. Its historical habitat is Norway's western coast, with its deep fjords and steep mountainsides.
When the industrial revolution brought machinery to the Norwegian farms, it didn't just change the old working methods, it also changed the layout and look of the farmland.
It was midsummer 1895. An older man was found drifting in the fjord just outside Moss, Norway - shot in the temple with a revolver. Who was he?
In this video-collection of historical photos, we reminisce about the dairy cow on the old Norwegian farm. We recommend that you watch with the sound on. Enjoy!
Skigard is a Norwegian noun that means wooden fence. It is made of split tree trunks, using simple tools. Fence making and mending was a task for early summer.
In the old Norwegian farming society, a husmann was a man who was allowed to build his home on a small section of a farm’s land, and pay with his labour instead of rent.
In Norway, the first traces of iron date back to 400-300 BC. The country has significant iron resources, and making tools and weapons from this new metal was a significant step forward.
When the ice melted after the last ice age, herds of reindeer followed in its wake. And with the animals came their main predator: the humans.
Folklore and old folk tales often depict The Black Death in the shape of an ashen-faced old woman. Her name was Pesta.
The spinning wheel was a lifelong companion for most women in the old Norwegian farming society. Enjoy this video-collection of wonderful vintage photographs.
With this old photograph in my hand I have set myself a task: how much information can I find in Norwegian online archives based on what the photo tells me?
A primstav is an old wooden calendar-stick, marking the days of the year and important events. It splits the year into two equal halves: summer and winter.
Skjemat is a Norwegian noun that means food eaten with a spoon - often before or after the main course at dinner. It could be porridge, soup, dessert, and more.
The Norwegian landscape is wild and beautiful. And it is a lot more than just fjords and mountains.
As a first such an event in modern times: the Norwegian counties Sør-Trøndelag and Nord-Trøndelag have now merged.
The Heddal stave church - stavkirke - is Norway's largest remaining building of its kind. It is a woodwork masterpiece, with a history that stretches back more than 800 years.
The Black Death – mother of all plagues - ravaged humankind in the mid-1300s. A Norwegian scholar takes us through the lead up to the disaster.
Myrmelk is a Norwegian noun that means milk conserved in a container buried in a mountain peat bog, left there for herders or others to drink at a later stage.
For more than a thousand years, Norwegian farmers sent their livestock to feed in the forests and the mountains. Today, this way of life has almost disappeared.
The horse no longer roams wild in the Norwegian landscape. But it still has an important place in the Norwegian psyche.
Bergen is Norway's second-largest city and one of the country's oldest urban locations. The first post-viking king, Olav Kyrre, gave it market-town-status around AD 1070.

Follow us on social media

Norwegian history