Vintage photos | the rose painted chests | Norway

The rose painted chests of Norway - a treasure that will live for centuries to come.
LA Dahlmann | talk NORWAY
Chest from 1697. Restoration work performed 1815 - probably by the artist Olav Hansson (1750-1820). | Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt - Norsk Folkemuseum NF.1917-0171 - CC BY-SA.
Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt – Norsk Folkemuseum NF.1917-0171 – CC BY-SA.

1. Chest from 1697

The chest above is from 1697. Restoration work performed 1815 – probably by the artist Olav Hansson (1750-1820). From Numedal, Buskerud. Kept at the Norsk Folkemuseum, Oslo.

2. Teigland, Hjartdal, Telemark

Norwegian rose painted – rosemalt – chest from Teigland, Hjartdal, Telemark. The assumed artist is Hans Olavson Glittenberg. The inscription year is 1826. Kept at the Vest-Telemark Museum, Telemark.

Norwegian rose painted - rosemalt - chest from Teigland, Hjartdal, Telemark. Assumed artist is Hans Olavson Glittenberg. Inscription year 1826. Kept at Vest-Telemark Museum, Telemark. | Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum - digitaltmuseum.no LB.00227 - CC BY-SA.

Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum – digitaltmuseum.no LB.00227 – CC BY-SA.

3. Gransherad, Telemark

Norwegian rose painted – rosemalt – chest from Gransherad, Telemark. The assumed artist is Olav Busnes. The inscription year is 1820. Kept at the Vest-Telemark Museum, Telemark.

Norwegian rose painted - rosemalt - chest from Gransherad, Telemark. Assumed artist is Olav Busnes. Inscription year 1820. Kept at Vest-Telemark Museum, Telemark. | Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum - digitaltmuseum.no MLA.212 - CC BY-SA.

Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum – digitaltmuseum.no MLA.212 – CC BY-SA.

4. Ørskog, Sunnmøre, Møre og Romsdal

Norwegian rose painted – rosemalt – chest from Ørskog, Sunnmøre, Møre og Romsdal. Artist is Luchas Nielsen Gram. Woodcarving by Eliasmesteren. Inscription: Karen M. Pedersdatter / Meelseth 1835. Kept at the Norsk Folkemuseum, Oslo.

Norwegian rose painted - rosemalt - chest from Ørskog, Sunnmøre, Møre og Romsdal. Artist is Luchas Nielsen Gram. Woodcarving by Eliasmesteren. Inscription: Karen M. Pedersdatter / Meelseth 1835. Kept at Norsk Folkemuseum, Oslo. | Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt - digitaltmuseum.no NF.1895-0499 - CC BY-SA.

Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt – digitaltmuseum.no NF.1895-0499 – CC BY-SA.

5. Chest from 1703

Norwegian rose painted – rosemalt – chest. Artist and original location unknown. The inscription years are 1703 and 1784. Kept at the Norsk Folkemuseum, Oslo.

Norwegian rose painted - rosemalt - chest. Artist and original location unknown. Inscription years 1703 and 1784. Kept at Norsk Folkemuseum, Oslo. | Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt - digitaltmuseum.no NF.1901-0211 - CC BY-SA.

Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt – digitaltmuseum.no NF.1901-0211 – CC BY-SA.

6. Chest from 1831

Rose painted – rosemalt – chest. Kept at the Larvik Museum, Vestfold. Artist unknown. The inscription year is 1831.

Norwegian rose painted - rosemalt - chest. Artist and original location unknown. Inscription year 1831. Kept at Larvik Museum, Vestfold. | Photo: Mekonnen Wolday - digitaltmuseum.no HL.00929 - CC BY-SA.

Photo: Mekonnen Wolday – digitaltmuseum.no HL.00929 – CC BY-SA

7. Fjotland, Kvinesdal, Agder

Norwegian rose painted – rosemalt – chest from Fjotland, Kvinesdal, Agder. Artist is Gutorm Persson Eftestøl. The inscription year is 1869. Kept at the Norsk Folkemuseum, Oslo.

Norwegian rose painted - rosemalt - chest from Fjotland, Kvinesdal, Agder. Artist is Gutorm Persson Eftestøl. Inscription year 1869. Kept at Norsk Folkemuseum, Oslo. | Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt - digitaltmuseum.no NF.1921-2016 - CC BY-SA.

Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt – digitaltmuseum.no NF.1921-2016 – CC BY-SA.

8. Åseral, Agder

Norwegian rose painted – rosemalt – chest from Åseral, Agder. Artist unknown. The inscription year is 1819. Kept at the Norsk Folkemuseum, Oslo.

Norwegian rose painted - rosemalt - chest from Åseral, Agder. Artist unknown. Inscription year 1819. Kept at Norsk Folkemuseum, Oslo. | Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt - digitaltmuseum.no NF.1922-0539 - CC BY-SA.

Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt – digitaltmuseum.no NF.1922-0539 – CC BY-SA.

9. Fjotland, Kvinesdal, Agder

Norwegian rose painted – rosemalt – chest from Fjotland, Kvinesdal, Agder. Belonged to Borel Jarkobson Lindeland. Artist unknown. The inscription year is 1829. Kept at the Norsk Folkemuseum, Oslo.

Norwegian rose painted - rosemalt - chest from Fjotland, Kvinesdal, Agder. Belonged to Borel Jarkobson Lindeland. Artist unknown. Inscription year 1829. Kept at Norsk Folkemuseum, Oslo. | Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt - digitaltmuseum.no NF.1922-1668 - CC BY-SA.

Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt – digitaltmuseum.no NF.1922-1668 – CC BY-SA.

10. Åseral, Agder

Norwegian rose painted – rosemalt – chest from Åseral, Agder. The assumed artist is Aslak Kolbeinsson Haaland. The inscription year is 1797. Kept at the Norsk Folkemuseum, Oslo.

Norwegian rose painted - rosemalt - chest from Åseral, Agder. Assumed artist is Aslak Kolbeinsson Haaland. Inscription year 1797. Kept at Norsk Folkemuseum, Oslo. | Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt - digitaltmuseum.no NF.1919-0867 - CC BY-SA.

Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfelt – digitaltmuseum.no NF.1919-0867 – CC BY-SA.

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