Vintage photos | the landscape | Norway

The Norwegian landscape is wild and beautiful. And it is a lot more than just fjords and mountains.
LA Dahlmann | talk NORWAY
Two ladies visiting a seasonal summer farm in Skeikampen, Gausdal, Oppland, Norway. The fencemaker has done a splendid job. Hopefully, no little lamb will get out - and no wolf get in. | Photo: Robert Collett - digitaltmuseum.no NF.09831-010 - public domain.

Kudos to the fencemaker

Two ladies visiting a seasonal summer farm at Skeikampen, Gausdal, Oppland, Norway. The fencemaker has done a splendid job. Hopefully, no little lamb will get out – and no wolf in.

Photo: Robert Collett – digitaltmuseum.no NF.09831-010 – public domain.

Don’t fence me in

Fencing – the old Norwegian way. To keep the domestic animals in – and the carnivores out? The Norwegian word is «skigard». The location is Sjusjøen, Ringsaker, Hedmark, Norway.

Fencing - the old Norwegian way. To keep the domestic animals in - and the carnivores out? The Norwegian word is «skigard». The location is Sjusjøen, Ringsaker, Hedmark, Norway. | Photo: Unknown Domkirkeodden - digitaltmuseum.no 0412-11695 - public domain.

Photo: Unknown Domkirkeodden – digitaltmuseum.no 0412-11695 – public domain.

Many a Norwegian’s dream

A small cabin – in the forest – by a lake: the dream place in many a Norwegian’s mind. Almost 40% of mainland Norway is covered by deciduous and perennial forests.

A small cabin - in the forest - by a lake: the dream place in many a Norwegian's mind. | Photo: Oleg Golikov - adobe stock - copyright.

Photo: Oleg Golikov – adobe stock – copyright.

Tranquil beauty

A boat on the canal. A beautiful and tranquil setting near the south coast. Reddalskanalen, Grimstad, Agder, Norway. Hand-coloured photo.

A boat on the canal. A beautiful and tranquil setting near the south coast. Reddalskanalen, Grimstad, Agder, Norway. Hand-coloured photo. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse - digitaltmuseum.no DEX_W_00541 - cc by.

Photo: Anders Beer Wilse – digitaltmuseum.no DEX_W_00541 – cc by.

The Norwegian mountains are the home of the trolls

Only 3% of the Norwegian mainland territory is agricultural land. This photo illustrates how people settled on whatever soil they could find – here surrounded by massive rock formations. It is not so strange that people believed that mountains like these were the homes of the gigantic Norwegian trolls. The location is the lake Lovatnet – Vassenden, Jølster, Sogn og Fjordane, Norway.

Lovatnet, Vassenden, Jølster, Sogn og Fjordane, Norway. | Photo: Andrey Armyagov - adobe stock - copyright.

Photo: Andrey Armyagov – adobe stock – copyright.

Norwegian bogs and wetland

All over Norway, you will find areas with bogs and wetland. In the old Norwegian farming society, turf from the bogs was cut and dried – and used as fuel for the fire. In the mountains, containers with milk were sometimes dug into the bog during the summer-pasture-season and stored there until people went hunting or berry-picking in the autumn. As there was little oxygen in the bog, the milk would keep fresh for people to drink.

This photo is from the Femundsmarka National Park in Hedmark and Trøndelag.

All over Norway there are areas of bogs and wetland. This photo is from the Femundsmarka National Park in Hedmark and Trøndelag. | Photo: Dace Znotina - adobe stock - copyright.

Photo: Dace Znotina – adobe stock – copyright.

Home of the midnight sun

And home of the old Norse gods. Lofoten, Nordland, Norway.

Home of the old norse gods. Lofoten, Nordland, Norway. | Photo: TTstudio - adobe stock - copyright.

Photo: TTstudio – adobe stock – copyright.

Breathtaking beauty

Norwegian landscape – mountains, water, and a lush green forest. I wonder who was the first person to walk through this magnificent scenery. Loelva, Loen, Stryn, Sogn og Fjordane, Norway.

Norwegian landscape - mountains, water, and a lush green forest. Loen river, Loen, Stryn, Sogn og Fjordane, Norway. | Photo: Sergey Bogomyako - adobe stock - copyrighted.

Photo: Sergey Bogomyako – adobe stock – copyright.

The land and the sea

A beautiful and rocky view from northern Norway – near Alta, Finnmark.

Beautiful view of northern Norway, near Alta, Finnmark. | Photo: Mateusz Fron - adobe stock - copyrighted

Photo: Mateusz Fron – adobe stock – copyrighted

After winter comes spring

A fruit tree in bloom in Hardanger, Hordaland. Hand-coloured photo.

A fruit tree in bloom in Hardanger, Hordaland. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse - digitaltmuseum.no DEX_W_00560 - CC BY.

Photo: Anders Beer Wilse – digitaltmuseum.no DEX_W_00560 – CC BY.

Haymaking in Valdres

The Lomen church in Vestre Slidre, Valdres, Oppland, Norway. In the foreground, haymaking – hanging the grass on wooden poles to dry. Hand-coloured photo.

The Lomen church in Vestre Slidre, Valdres, Oppland, Norway. In the foreground, haymaking - hanging the grass on wooden poles to dry. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse - digitaltmuseum.no DEX_W_00531 - CC BY.

Photo: Anders Beer Wilse – digitaltmuseum.no DEX_W_00531 – CC BY.

The Briksdal glacier

Old house near the Briksdal glacier in Stryn, Sogn og Fjordane, Norway.

Old house near the Briksdal glacier in Stryn, Sogn og Fjordane, Norway. | Photo: Nikolai Sorokin - fotolia.co.uk - copyrighted.

Photo: Nikolai Sorokin – fotolia.co.uk – copyright.

A Buick on the rocks

A Buick 29-51X at Norway’s southernmost point, Lindesnes, Agder. Hand-coloured photo.

A Buick 29-51X at Norway's southernmost point, Lindesnes, Agder in 1934. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse - digitaltmuseum.no DEX_W_00458 - CC BY.

Photo: Anders Beer Wilse – digitaltmuseum.no DEX_W_00458 – CC BY.

The fjords are valleys filled with sea water

The Norwegian fjords are valleys filled with sea water. The Aurlandfjord and the Sognefjord, as seen from Stegastein.

The Norwegian fjords are ancient valleys filled with sea water. The Aurlandfjord and the Sognefjord from Stegastein. | Photo: gevisions - adobe stock - copyright.

Photo: gevisions – adobe stock – copyright.

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