Vintage photos | the domestic animals | Norway

Watch some lovely vintage photos of mankinds's many good friends.
LA Dahlmann | talk NORWAY
Through the millennia, this is how the Norwegians used the Norwegian Fjord horse to transport goods - through the roadless mountains and forests. The man in the photo is Nils Havrevoll - and it was taken in 1945. The location is Havrevoll, Suldal, Rogaland. | Photo: Marta Hoffmann - digitaltmuseum.no NF.02941-044 - cc by-sa.

The horse – in a landscape without proper roads

Through the millennia, this is how the Norwegians used the Norwegian Fjord horse to transport goods – through the roadless mountains and forests. The man in the photo is Nils Havrevoll – and it was taken in 1945. The location is Havrevoll, Suldal, Rogaland.

Photo: Marta Hoffmann – digitaltmuseum.no NF.02941-044 – cc by-sa.

Bringing in the hay

This magnificent photograph shows how horse and man worked together as a team to secure the winter feed for the domestic animals. The year is 1950, and the location is Linderud farm in Oslo, Norway.

Bringing in the hay. This magnificent photograph shows how horse and man worked together as a team to secure the winter feed for the domestic animals. The year is 1950, and the location is Linderud farm in Oslo, Norway. | Photo: Unknown Oslo museum - digitaltmuseum.no OB.FS0138 - cc by-sa.

Photo: Unknown Oslo museum – digitaltmuseum.no OB.FS0138 – cc by-sa.

The Norwegian Elkhound

John Blæsterdalen and his Norwegian Elkhound in front of the storehouse – stabburet. The location is Folldal, Hedmark, Norge – and the year is 1968.

John Blæsterdalen and his Norwegian Elkhound in front of the storehouse - stabburet. The location is Folldal, Hedmark, Norge - and the year is 1968. | Photo: Per Magne Grue - digitaltmuseum MINØ.100835 - cc by.

Photo: Per Magne Grue – digitaltmuseum MINØ.100835 – cc by.

Preparing the soil for a new growing season

A man and his Norwegian Dole horse are preparing the soil in early spring. The location is Volvat, Oslo, Norway – and the date is 17 May 1940. Norway has only recently been invaded by German forces. It is presumably the hill of Holmenkollen in the background.

A man and his Norwegian Dole horse are preparing the soil in early spring. The location is Volvat, Oslo, Norway - and the year is 1940. | Photo: Esther Langberg - digitaltmuseum.no OB.Z16621 - cc by-sa.

Photo: Esther Langberg – digitaltmuseum.no OB.Z16621 – cc by-sa.

The cow’s milk and its by-products were and are an essential ingredient in the Norwegian diet

On the old Norwegian farm, milking the cows and the goats was usually the women’s domain. However, the men also took their turn on occasion. Notice how clean and well-groomed the cow is. The photo is from around 1930.

Milking the cows and the goats were usually the women's domain. But the men also took their turn on occasion. Notice how clean and well-groomed the cow is. The photo is from around 1930. | Photo: Esther Langberg - digitaltmuseum.no step up to the mark - cc by-sa.

Photo: Esther Langberg – digitaltmuseum.no OB.Z17968 – cc by-sa.

Are we certain about the dog being man’s best friend?

This beautiful 1940s photo shows the close connection between two Norwegian Fjord horses and Alf Larsen – son of Sara and Lars A. Larsen. The location is one of the slate quarries in Friarfjord, Lebesby, Finnmark, Norway.

This beautiful 1940s photo shows the close connection between two Norwegian Fjord horses and Alf Larsen - son of Sara and Lars A. Larsen. The location is the slate quarries in Friarfjord, Lebesby, Finnmark, Norway. | Photo: Finnmark fylkesbibliotek - digitaltmuseum.no FBib.13004-004 - public domain.

Photo: Finnmark fylkesbibliotek – digitaltmuseum.no FBib.13004-004 – public domain.

The bliss of Norwegian mountain pasture

A Norwegian Fjord horse and a young cow on summer pasture. The location is Jotunheimen and the year is 1968.

Historically, the Norwegians sent most of their livestock to the mountains or forests during the summer months. There, the animals fed on everything that Mother Nature had to offer. The first proper summer pasture animal-headcount took place in 1907. Here is an overview of the results:

  • Summer dairy locations in use: 44 239
  • Horses: 17 050
  • Dairy cows: 186 987
  • Bulls: 8 358
  • Young cattle: 79 562
  • Sheep: 367 805
  • Goats: 142 319
  • Pigs: 6 172

In 1907, the human population was 2.3 million – and 60% of the people lived in rural areas.

A fjord horse and a young cow on summer pasture. Jotunheimen in 1968. | Photo: Paul A. Røstad - digitaltmuseum.no DEX_PR_000749 - CC BY-SA.

Photo: Paul A. Røstad – digitaltmuseum.no DEX_PR_000749 – CC BY-SA.

The working day is over. Norwegian Dole horse. Lyngdal parsonage in 1929. Lyngdal, Agder, Norway

The working day is over. Norwegian Dole horse. Lyngdal parsonage in 1929. Lyngdal, Agder, Norway. Hand-coloured photo. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse - digitaltmuseum.no DEX_W_00453 - CC BY.

The working day is over. Norwegian Dole horse. Lyngdal parsonage in 1929. Lyngdal, Agder, Norway. Hand-coloured photo. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse – digitaltmuseum.no DEX_W_00453 – CC BY.

Enjoying the wonders of summer pasture

Norwegian sheep enjoying the wonders of summer pasture. Near Likholefossen, Gaular, Sogn og Fjordane. | Photo: compuinfoto - adobe stock - copyright.

Norwegian sheep enjoying the wonders of summer pasture. Near Likholefossen, Gaular, Sogn og Fjordane. In the old Norwegian farming society, the sheep’s wool provided clothing for the whole family. | Photo: compuinfoto – adobe stock – copyright.

Norwegian horses ready for service

The steamer Alden, Loen, Stryn, Sogn og Fjordane. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse - kulturminnebilder.ra.no T309_01_0034 - Public domain.

The steamer Alden, Loen, Stryn, Sogn og Fjordane. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse – kulturminnebilder.ra.no T309_01_0034 – Public domain.

The beautiful Norwegian Fjord horse

Norwegian Fjord horse - mare and foal. Ørsta, Møre og Romsdal. | Photo: googleme - wikimedia - CC BY-SA.

Norwegian Fjord horse – mare and foal. Ørsta, Møre og Romsdal. | Photo: googleme – wikimedia – CC BY-SA.

Resting in the sunshine at Gjendesheim

A Norwegian pig enjoying the sunshine. Gjendesheim, Vågå, Oppland. | Photo: Paul A. Røstad digitaltmuseum - CC BY.

A Norwegian pig enjoying the sunshine. Gjendesheim, Vågå, Oppland. | Photo: Paul A. Røstad digitaltmuseum – CC BY.

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