Vintage photos | the artwork | Norway

A photo is a snapshot of history - and a story and a history lesson in itself.
LA Dahlmann | talk NORWAY
Bridal procession on the Hardanger fjord

Bridal procession on the Hardanger fjord

The main photo is of the “Bridal procession on the Hardanger fjord” – painted by the artists Adolph Tidemand and Hans Gude in 1848 – has an iconic status in its homeland, Norway.

A boat was the primary means of transportation for the people living alongside Norway’s many fjords, well into the 1900s.

The painting will be a centrepiece of the new National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design, opening its doors in the middle of the capital Oslo in 2021.

From a pine tree and some paint came this beautiful chair

A rose painted and hollowed out wooden chair from Lunde, Telemark, Norway. The woodwork is by Sigurd Teigland – and the painting by Knut K. Hovden. The wood was taken from the root of a pine tree from Presteheide.

A rose painted and hollowed out wooden chair from Lunde, Telemark, Norway. The woodwork is by Sigurd Teigland - and the painting by Knut K. Hovden. The wood was taken from the root of a pine tree from Presteheide. | Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum - digitaltmuseum.no LB.03426 - cc by-sa.

Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum – digitaltmuseum.no LB.03426 – cc by-sa.

A rose painted and hollowed out wooden chair from Lunde, Telemark, Norway. The woodwork is by Sigurd Teigland - and the painting by Knut K. Hovden. The wood was taken from the root of a pine tree from Presteheide. | Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum - digitaltmuseum.no LB.03426 - cc by-sa.

Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum – digitaltmuseum.no LB.03426 – cc by-sa.

A rose painted and hollowed out wooden chair from Lunde, Telemark, Norway. The woodwork is by Sigurd Teigland - and the painting by Knut K. Hovden. The wood was taken from the root of a pine tree from Presteheide. | Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum - digitaltmuseum.no LB.03426 - cc by-sa.

Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum – digitaltmuseum.no LB.03426 – cc by-sa.

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