Vintage photos | the artwork | Norway

A photo is a snapshot of history - and a story and a history lesson in itself.
LA Dahlmann | talk NORWAY
Bridal procession on the Hardanger fjord

Bridal procession on the Hardanger fjord

The main photo is of the “Bridal procession on the Hardanger fjord” – painted by the artists Adolph Tidemand and Hans Gude in 1848 – has an iconic status in its homeland, Norway.

A boat was the primary means of transportation for the people living alongside Norway’s many fjords, well into the 1900s.

The painting will be a centrepiece of the new National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design, opening its doors in the middle of the capital Oslo in 2021.

From a pine tree and some paint came this beautiful chair

A rose painted and hollowed out wooden chair from Lunde, Telemark, Norway. The woodwork is by Sigurd Teigland – and the painting by Knut K. Hovden. The wood was taken from the root of a pine tree from Presteheide.

A rose painted and hollowed out wooden chair from Lunde, Telemark, Norway. The woodwork is by Sigurd Teigland - and the painting by Knut K. Hovden. The wood was taken from the root of a pine tree from Presteheide. | Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum - digitaltmuseum.no LB.03426 - cc by-sa.

Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum – digitaltmuseum.no LB.03426 – cc by-sa.

A rose painted and hollowed out wooden chair from Lunde, Telemark, Norway. The woodwork is by Sigurd Teigland - and the painting by Knut K. Hovden. The wood was taken from the root of a pine tree from Presteheide. | Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum - digitaltmuseum.no LB.03426 - cc by-sa.

Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum – digitaltmuseum.no LB.03426 – cc by-sa.

A rose painted and hollowed out wooden chair from Lunde, Telemark, Norway. The woodwork is by Sigurd Teigland - and the painting by Knut K. Hovden. The wood was taken from the root of a pine tree from Presteheide. | Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum - digitaltmuseum.no LB.03426 - cc by-sa.

Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum – digitaltmuseum.no LB.03426 – cc by-sa.

Our most recent posts

My Norwegian heritage

The traditional Sami houses, the goahti, were in use until well into our own time. Anders Larsen tells us how he remembers them from the coastal Sami communities in northern Norway.
Kløvhest is a Norwegian noun that means packhorse. Well into our own time, the Norwegians used horses to help transport goods through a challenging landscape.
Skjemat is a Norwegian noun that means food eaten with a spoon - often before or after the main course at dinner. It could be porridge, soup, dessert, and more.
After the Black Death, it took the Norwegian communities centuries to recover. And soon, the country also lost its independence.
Queen Maud of Norway was born in London in 1869, as Princess Maud of Wales. Her grandmother was none other than the formidable Queen Victoria.
The old Norwegian farm needed hundreds of litres of water every single day: for food-making, cleaning, and human and animal consumption.
With a growing population and public sector, Norway pushed through significant reforms in several areas: public structure and organisation, welfare, health care, tax, policing, public services, and more.
Myrmelk is a Norwegian noun that means milk conserved in a container buried in a mountain peat bog, left there for herders or others to drink at a later stage.
17 May 1814 is regarded as the birth of the modern-day Norwegian state. But it took almost another hundred years before the Norwegians could declare complete independence.
A primstav is an old wooden calendar-stick, marking the days of the year and important events. It splits the year into two equal halves: summer and winter.
Ljå is a Norwegian noun that means a scythe - an old agricultural cutting-tool used when mowing the grass to make hay, or when harvesting the grain crops.
Uff da! is a Norwegian interjection, often used to express sympathy. For example when a child falls over: Uff da! Slo du deg? - meaning Poor you! Did you hurt yourself?
In the spring, the Norwegian mountain-snow melts and turns into creeks, rivers and magnificent waterfalls.
Bergen is Norway's second-largest city and one of the country's oldest urban locations. The first post-viking king, Olav Kyrre, gave it market-town-status around AD 1070.
In my childhood, life was simple. And the small joys of Christmas lifted our spirits - and delivered us safely into the new year.
Some of the beautiful Norwegian wooden stave churches are almost 1000 years old. Today, there are 28 of them left.
Oslo is the capital city of Norway. It was founded in AD 1048 by the Viking king Harald Hardråde. Historically, the city is also known as Christiania or Kristiania.
Folklore and old folk tales often depict The Black Death in the shape of an ashen-faced old woman. Her name was Pesta.
The Norwegian landscape is wild and beautiful. And it is a lot more than just fjords and mountains.
In this post, we take a look at the layout of the Norwegian farm and its surroundings - and how the land and its resources were utilised.
In this video-collection of historical photos, we reminisce about the dairy cow on the old Norwegian farm. We recommend that you watch with the sound on. Enjoy!

Follow us on social media

Norwegian history