Vintage photos | the artwork | Norway

A photo is a snapshot of history - and a story and a history lesson in itself.
LA Dahlmann | talk NORWAY
Bridal procession on the Hardanger fjord

Bridal procession on the Hardanger fjord

The main photo is of the “Bridal procession on the Hardanger fjord” – painted by the artists Adolph Tidemand and Hans Gude in 1848 – has an iconic status in its homeland, Norway.

A boat was the primary means of transportation for the people living alongside Norway’s many fjords, well into the 1900s.

The painting will be a centrepiece of the new National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design, opening its doors in the middle of the capital Oslo in 2021.

From a pine tree and some paint came this beautiful chair

A rose painted and hollowed out wooden chair from Lunde, Telemark, Norway. The woodwork is by Sigurd Teigland – and the painting by Knut K. Hovden. The wood was taken from the root of a pine tree from Presteheide.

A rose painted and hollowed out wooden chair from Lunde, Telemark, Norway. The woodwork is by Sigurd Teigland - and the painting by Knut K. Hovden. The wood was taken from the root of a pine tree from Presteheide. | Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum - digitaltmuseum.no LB.03426 - cc by-sa.

Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum – digitaltmuseum.no LB.03426 – cc by-sa.

A rose painted and hollowed out wooden chair from Lunde, Telemark, Norway. The woodwork is by Sigurd Teigland - and the painting by Knut K. Hovden. The wood was taken from the root of a pine tree from Presteheide. | Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum - digitaltmuseum.no LB.03426 - cc by-sa.

Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum – digitaltmuseum.no LB.03426 – cc by-sa.

A rose painted and hollowed out wooden chair from Lunde, Telemark, Norway. The woodwork is by Sigurd Teigland - and the painting by Knut K. Hovden. The wood was taken from the root of a pine tree from Presteheide. | Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum - digitaltmuseum.no LB.03426 - cc by-sa.

Photo: Vest-Telemark Museum – digitaltmuseum.no LB.03426 – cc by-sa.

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My Norwegian heritage

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The Heddal stave church - stavkirke - is Norway's largest remaining building of its kind. It is a woodwork masterpiece, with a history that stretches back more than 800 years.
In 1997, His Majesty King Harald V of Norway came to the Norwegian Sami Assembly with an essential and overdue apology.
The wild ocean world of Værøy in Lofoten, Norway, was the birthplace of Mimmi Benjaminsen – born in 1894. Here are some of her childhood memories.
On 9 April 1940, German forces attacked Norway in the early hours of the morning. The Norwegian armed forces attempted to stave off the attack, but they were in no way prepared for this monumental task.
Do you have trouble sleeping? Here are some examples of how the old Norwegians used Mother Nature’s very own remedies to cure their ailments.
Klippfisk - or klipfish - is fish preserved through salting and drying. Since the early 1700s, the Norwegians have been large-scale klippfisk producers and exporters.
For the old Norwegians, making butter was simply a way of preserving the fresh summer milk - turning it into a type of food that could be stored.
The rose painted chests of Norway - a treasure that will live for centuries to come.
Whether it be on a rainy day - or a beautiful summer’s day like this one - the coastal paths take us through some pleasing stretches of Norwegian scenery.
Once you start taking an interest in the old Norwegian farming and family history, then the people of the past start coming to the fore.
Skigard is a Norwegian noun that means wooden fence. It is made of split tree trunks, using simple tools. Fence making and mending was a task for early summer.
In a cold country like Norway, warm clothing is essential. This is a refined and old version of a woollen sweater from the district of Setesdal.
Kløvhest is a Norwegian noun that means packhorse. Well into our own time, the Norwegians used horses to help transport goods through a challenging landscape.
Here is a collection of some wonderful vintage photos, showing a handful of Norwegians and their lives.
Bondegård is a Norwegian noun that means farm. In informal speech and in many dialects, people only use the single word gård or gard.
When there were no makeshift or permanent dwellings nearby, the Sami hunters and herders sometimes slept under the open sky.
Skårfast is a Norwegian adjective that means that a person or an animal is stuck on a steep mountain- or cliff-side shelf, and in need of being rescued.
In the olden days, people dressed up warmly and got out onto the fjord or lake to catch their Sunday dinner. Enjoy!
Here are 12 historical photos representing the fascinating Sami culture - with deep roots in the Norwegian and Nordic landscape.
Magne Løvstuen and his family adopted this moose calf after saving it from drowning in Lake Mjøsa.

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