Vintage photos | spending Easter with the lads in 1906 | Norway

At Easter in 1906, renowned Norwegian photographer Anders Beer Wilse took this series of photos on a trip with a group of friends.
LA Dahlmann | talk NORWAY
This photo comes with the caption «The idiots are dancing». Brøttum, Sjusjøen, Ringsaker, Hedmark, Norway - Easter in 1906. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse - Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.
Photo: Anders Beer Wilse - Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.

The idiots are dancing

The location was Sjusjøen, Ringsaker, Hedmark, Norway – and the main photo above comes with the caption: «The idiots are dancing». Such things happen when you are lucky enough to meet an organ grinder on your way to the mountains.

Soaking up the sun

Basking in the spring sun. Brøttum, Sjusjøen, Ringsaker, Hedmark, Norway - Easter in 1906. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse - Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.
Photo: Anders Beer Wilse – Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.

After a long winter, and a long walk, there is nothing like a rest in the warm April sun.

Gymnastics and snow-bathing

Gymnastics and snowbathing. Brøttum, Sjusjøen, Ringsaker, Hedmark, Norway - Easter in 1906. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse - Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.
Photo: Anders Beer Wilse – Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.

Full of energy the next morning, starting the day with some gymnastics and snow-bathing. Yet another gloriously sunny day.

Mountains, snow, and fresh air

Easter tourists. Brøttum, Sjusjøen, Ringsaker, Hedmark, Norway - in 1906. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse - Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.
Photo: Anders Beer Wilse – Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.

What better way to spend your Easter break. Note how two of the skiers only have one ski pole. Having two is a fairly modern thing.

Time for a break

After a long winter, the Norwegians can't get enough of the warming sun. røttum, Sjusjøen, Ringsaker, Hedmark, Norway - Easter in 1906. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse - Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.
Photo: Anders Beer Wilse – Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.

Time for a break – and to work on the tan.

After a long day in the mountains

Ready for some food, and rest in front of the fire. Brøttum, Sjusjøen, Ringsaker, Hedmark, Norway - Easter in 1906. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse - Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.
Photo: Anders Beer Wilse – Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.

After a long day in the mountains, it is time for some rest and some food. The light in the window is a 1906 photoshop.

A simple meal

Time for food and a jolly conversation. Brøttum, Sjusjøen, Ringsaker, Hedmark, Norway - Easter in 1906. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse - Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.
Photo: Anders Beer Wilse – Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.

A simple meal and some good conversations around the table. You can almost smell the coffee, and hear the voices.

Time to go home

On their way home. Brøttum, Sjusjøen, Ringsaker, Hedmark, Norway - Easter in 1906. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse - Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.
Photo: Anders Beer Wilse – Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.

No cars or snowmobiles in those days; just your own two feet. The group is on their way back down to the valley, where the snow is almost all gone.

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