Vintage photos | spending Easter with the lads in 1906 | Norway

At Easter in 1906, renowned Norwegian photographer Anders Beer Wilse took this series of photos on a trip with a group of friends.
LA Dahlmann | talk NORWAY
This photo comes with the caption «The idiots are dancing». Brøttum, Sjusjøen, Ringsaker, Hedmark, Norway - Easter in 1906. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse - Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.
Photo: Anders Beer Wilse - Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.

The idiots are dancing

The location was Sjusjøen, Ringsaker, Hedmark, Norway – and the main photo above comes with the caption: «The idiots are dancing». Such things happen when you are lucky enough to meet an organ grinder on your way to the mountains.

Soaking up the sun

Basking in the spring sun. Brøttum, Sjusjøen, Ringsaker, Hedmark, Norway - Easter in 1906. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse - Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.
Photo: Anders Beer Wilse – Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.

After a long winter, and a long walk, there is nothing like a rest in the warm April sun.

Gymnastics and snow-bathing

Gymnastics and snowbathing. Brøttum, Sjusjøen, Ringsaker, Hedmark, Norway - Easter in 1906. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse - Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.
Photo: Anders Beer Wilse – Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.

Full of energy the next morning, starting the day with some gymnastics and snow-bathing. Yet another gloriously sunny day.

Mountains, snow, and fresh air

Easter tourists. Brøttum, Sjusjøen, Ringsaker, Hedmark, Norway - in 1906. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse - Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.
Photo: Anders Beer Wilse – Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.

What better way to spend your Easter break. Note how two of the skiers only have one ski pole. Having two is a fairly modern thing.

Time for a break

After a long winter, the Norwegians can't get enough of the warming sun. røttum, Sjusjøen, Ringsaker, Hedmark, Norway - Easter in 1906. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse - Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.
Photo: Anders Beer Wilse – Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.

Time for a break – and to work on the tan.

After a long day in the mountains

Ready for some food, and rest in front of the fire. Brøttum, Sjusjøen, Ringsaker, Hedmark, Norway - Easter in 1906. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse - Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.
Photo: Anders Beer Wilse – Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.

After a long day in the mountains, it is time for some rest and some food. The light in the window is a 1906 photoshop.

A simple meal

Time for food and a jolly conversation. Brøttum, Sjusjøen, Ringsaker, Hedmark, Norway - Easter in 1906. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse - Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.
Photo: Anders Beer Wilse – Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.

A simple meal and some good conversations around the table. You can almost smell the coffee, and hear the voices.

Time to go home

On their way home. Brøttum, Sjusjøen, Ringsaker, Hedmark, Norway - Easter in 1906. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse - Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.
Photo: Anders Beer Wilse – Norsk Folkemuseum cc pdm.

No cars or snowmobiles in those days; just your own two feet. The group is on their way back down to the valley, where the snow is almost all gone.

Our most recent posts

My Norwegian heritage

Skibladner is one of the world's oldest paddle steamers still in regular service. She was launched in 1856, and sails on Norway's largest lake, Mjøsa.
In a cold country like Norway, warm clothing is essential. This is a refined and old version of a woollen sweater from the district of Setesdal.
Kantslått is a Norwegian noun that means (1) the grass that is cut along the edges of a field, a road, etc. or (2) the actual process of cutting this grass. Traditionally, the grass was used as animal fodder.
When the ice melted after the last ice age, herds of reindeer followed in its wake. And with the animals came their main predator: the humans.
When there were no makeshift or permanent dwellings nearby, the Sami hunters and herders sometimes slept under the open sky.
Our foremothers were hardworking and inventive. Here you can read more about how the laundry was done on a Norwegian mountain farm in the late 1800s.
In the spring, the Norwegian mountain-snow melts and turns into creeks, rivers and magnificent waterfalls.
Budrått is a Norwegian noun that means the output of milk products on a farm - such as cheese and butter. The word is often associated with what was produced during the summer on the seasonal mountain or forest pasture farm - the seter.
The Norwegian landscape is wild and beautiful. And it is a lot more than just fjords and mountains.
In this video-collection of historical photos, we visit the west coast of Norway and the region of Sogn og Fjordane. We recommend that you watch with the sound on. Enjoy!
Myrmelk is a Norwegian noun that means milk conserved in a container buried in a mountain peat bog, left there for herders or others to drink at a later stage.
In 1935, Aslaug Engnæs published a guidance book on how to milk the cow.
After a troubled ten-year courtship, the current King Harald V of Norway finally got to marry his Miss Sonja Haraldsen on the 29th of August 1968.
This beautiful oil painting by Johan Christian Dahl says a lot about generations of Norwegians - and the landscape and the skills they knew.
For many, it may come as a surprise that the history of rose painting and its place in Norwegian folk art is not as old as one might think.
The old Norwegian farm needed hundreds of litres of water every single day: for food-making, cleaning, and human and animal consumption.
The Stone age people were master hunters, fishers, and gatherers. The lived with the seasons and followed the prey.
In my childhood, life was simple. And the small joys of Christmas lifted our spirits - and delivered us safely into the new year.
The most significant sections of Norwegian productive soil can be found in the counties of Trøndelag, Hedmark, Oppland and Rogaland.
It was midsummer 1895. An older man was found drifting in the fjord just outside Moss, Norway - shot in the temple with a revolver. Who was he?
The oldest wooden buildings in Norway are almost 1000 years old - like Urnes stave church in Luster. How come these buildings do not rot away and disappear?

Follow us on social media

Norwegian history