Ski history | hunting in a landscape with deep snow | Norway

The word ski comes from the Old Norse language, with the meaning cleft wood. The old Norwegians were master hunters, and have been skiing for over 5000 years.
LA Dahlmann | talk NORWAY
The Rødøy skier - rock carving from 2000 BC - Rødøy, Nordland, Norway. | Illustration: Based on a stamp published by Posten Norge.
The Rødøy skier - rock carving from 2000 BC - Rødøy, Nordland, Norway. | Illustration: Based on a stamp published by Posten Norge.

Pronunciation

Ski

Rock carvings and archaeological finds

The above illustration is based on a stone-age rock carving, found at Rødøy in the Norwegian region of Nordland. Some say that the depiction shows a person in a boat, but the general belief is that she or he is one of Norway’s earliest skiers. In 1959, Johan Kleivhaug found 5000-year-old ski-remains on his land in Vefsn, also in Nordland. Norway’s historical Sami and Norse populations were both excellent skiers – and guarded and guided their abilities safely through the millennia and into our own time.

Hunting in the deep snow

When the early Norwegians were out hunting, they moved through vast areas of land. In winter, the ground was covered by deep snow, and they needed a tool to help them conquer the elements; they needed skis. Not only did a simple pair of wooden planks allow the hunter to float on top of the snow, they also allowed her to move as fast as the wind.

The skis were shaped to fit the landscape

Throughout history, the length and width of the skis have changed. It was very much the layout of the landscape and the practical use that decided the design; some were long, some short, and some wide. Every generation and every community had their own master ski-maker, who adjusted, tweaked, and improved as the millennia passed by.

Clad with fur

Today, ski wax is applied to the bottom side of the skis to create the optimal glide. It is all very high tech. Our ancestors, on the other hand, used quite a different method. They simply attached animal fur to the bottom of the ski, with the tip of the hairs pointing backwards. This gave a good forward glide, and had the opposite effect when moving uphill. Fur-clad skis have been in use well into our own time.

One long and one short ski

In steeper terrain, the two skis were often of equal length. However, in areas with relatively flat or undulating mountain plateaus and forestland, there would often be one long and one short ski – a langski and an andor or ånder. The long ski was on the left foot and was mainly used for gliding. The short ski on the right foot was used when moving forward, steering, and climbing uphill. It was usually this shorter right-hand side andor that had fur underneath.

Only one ski pole

Today’s skiers have two poles when out in the tracks. Our forebears made do with just the one. Photographs from as late as in the early 1900s show that the one pole was still the norm.

Gods and Vikings

The old Norse winter-god Ull was a master at skiing, running faster and bolder than anyone else. And the goddess Skade could ski down the hill and still shoot with her bow and arrow. A Viking warrior was no less of a skier than he was a swordsman.

Visit the Norwegian ski museum when you are next in Oslo

The next time that you visit Norway’s capital Oslo, ask a passer-by to point out the Holmenkollen ski jump for you, up on one of the hills shielding the city. You can easily see the majestic lambda-shaped structure from down-town Oslo. To most Norwegians, Holmenkollen is a symbol of pride, a link back to their ancient past. The Oslo Metro will take you there in 30 minutes – high above the city. We highly recommend the outing. And whilst you are there, why not visit the Norwegian Ski Museum. We are sure that you will not regret the trip.

Main source: «Norsk skitradisjon» by Olav Bø – Det norske samlaget 1966.

Advertisement

End of advertisement

Our most recent posts

Advertisement

End of advertisement

My Norwegian heritage

In the old Norwegian farming society, a husmann was a man who was allowed to build his home on a small section of a farm’s land, and pay with his labour instead of rent.
The majestic Norwegian mountains can be treacherous - and they steal human lives every year. Study the Norwegian mountain code - and be prepared for your next journey.
The first Norwegian Buhund breed-standard came in 1926, based on a dog that had evolved, lived, and worked with the Norwegians since time immemorial.
Do you know the name of Norway’s capital city? Test yourself, friends, and family in this 10 multiple-choice questions quiz vol. 1. See the correct answer below each photo.
Carl Fredrik Sundt-Hansen created this fascinating oil painting in 1904. It is like a window leading into the house of history. If only we could climb through.
The most significant sections of Norwegian productive soil can be found in the counties of Trøndelag, Hedmark, Oppland and Rogaland.
When humankind first appeared in the Norwegian landscape – sometime after the last ice age – the search for food was their primary motivation.
Like all buildings on the old Norwegian farm, the stabbur had a clear purpose: it was a building designed for the storage of food.
In 1935, Aslaug Engnæs published a guidance book on how to milk the cow.
With the birth of the new Norwegian national state in 1814, came big ideas. And one of them was to establish better transportation systems.
Some vintage photos - and more to come.
In the old farming society, nature dictated the flow of the working year. And farmworkers could only leave their jobs on 2 specific days during the year.
A photo is a snapshot of history - and a story and a history lesson in itself.
The spinning wheel was a lifelong companion for most women in the old Norwegian farming society. Enjoy this video-collection of wonderful vintage photographs.
Åre is a Norwegian noun that means an open fireplace, placed on the floor in the middle of a room. The smoke goes up and out through a vent in the roof - the ljore.
Klippfisk - or klipfish - is fish preserved through salting and drying. Since the early 1700s, the Norwegians have been large-scale klippfisk producers and exporters.
Are you looking for a Norwegian-to-English dictionary that includes old-fashioned words and dialect words? Then Einar Haugen’s book is your best pick.
The traditional Norwegians are drawn to their cabins, whether it be in the mountains, in the forest, or by the sea. Some would say that they are a people obsessed.
For more than a thousand years, Norwegian farmers sent their livestock to feed in the forests and the mountains. Today, this way of life has almost disappeared.
During the AD 1970s, both an increased female participation in the labour market, and the green movement, were causes firmly added to the agenda. There was a heightened focus on maternity leave, access to kindergarten, and maternity benefits.
Watch some lovely vintage photos of mankinds's many good friends.

Follow us on social media

Norwegian history