King Haakon, Crown Prince Olav and Queen Maud in the Bygdøy Royal Farm garden, just outside the Oslo city centre. The year is 1911. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse - nasjonalbiblioteket - public domain.
King Haakon, Crown Prince Olav and Queen Maud in the Bygdøy Royal Farm garden, just outside the Oslo city centre. The year is 1911. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse - nasjonalbiblioteket - public domain.

For most Norwegians, Queen Maud of Norway was and is somewhat of an enigma, almost mythical. This despite the fact that she was queen consort alongside her husband King Haakon VII for more than 30 years.

She passed away in 1938, and was never part of the enormous surge in popularity experienced by the royal family during and after the Second World War.

Shortly before his own passing in 1991, in conversation with royal biographer Arvid Møller, her son King Olav V lifted his mother’s memory up and into the light of history by saying these loving and heartfelt words:

«It is my wish that the Norwegian public should get to know her many strong sides: her wonderful personality and sense of humour, the warmth and compassion that she gave in abundance to all those close to her. She was in truth a fantastic and joyful human being».

Arvid Møller is one of Norway’s most productive biographers. In 1992 he published the book «Dronning Maud – et portrett», honouring the wish of his late Majesty.

Haakon, Olav and Maud in the gardens at the Bygdøy Royal Farm, just outside the Oslo city centre. The year is 1911. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse - nasjonalbiblioteket - public domain.
Photo: Anders Beer Wilse – nasjonalbiblioteket – public domain.