Norwegian history | transformation and neoliberalism | Norway

During the AD 1970s, both an increased female participation in the labour market, and the green movement, were causes firmly added to the agenda. There was a heightened focus on maternity leave, access to kindergarten, and maternity benefits.
LA Dahlmann | talk NORWAY
Norway in 1970. | Photo: Rigmor Dahl Delphin - Oslo Museum cc by-sa.
Norway in 1970. | Photo: Rigmor Dahl Delphin – Oslo Museum cc by-sa.

Transformation and neoliberalism | AD 1970 – 1990

In AD 1972, there was a fierce debate on whether Norway should or should not become part of the European Economic Community (EEC), which later became the EU. Through a referendum, 53.5% rejected the move. The same thing happened in a second attempt in AD 1994.

Throughout the AD 1970s, the bipartisan atmosphere after World War 2 started to wear off. The economic development slowed down and there was an emerging doubt about the efficiency of the regulated post-war-model. This led to a significant political shift in the AD 1980s, where many previously regulated areas of society were liberalised: like housing, banking, mass media, and more.

Next period: Norwegian history | technology and globalisation | Norway

Or see the full: History timeline | from stone age to modern era | Norway

BC = before Christ | AD = anno domini = after Christ
Main source: Store norske leksikon – snl.no

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