Norwegian history | the post World War 2 era | Norway

After the end of World War 2, the Norwegians all took part in lifting their country well and truly into the 20th century.
LA Dahlmann | talk NORWAY
King Olav V of Norway inspecting the cows. Ekeberg, Oslo in 1959. | Photo: Leif Ørnelund - digitaltmuseum.no OB.Ø59_1527b - CC BY-SA.
King Olav V of Norway inspecting the troops. Ekeberg, Oslo in 1959. | Photo: Leif Ørnelund – Oslo Museum cc by-sa.

The post World War 2 era | AD 1945 – 1970

A post-war bipartisan spirit and communal energy lifted Norway into a whole new level of activity and development. The labour party – Arbeiderpartiet – governed for 20 of the 25 following years. The labour movement was instrumental in creating the modern-day welfare state that Norway is so renowned for today.

King Haakon 7 passed away in AD 1957, a hero from both the events in AD 1905, and for his role as a beacon of hope during World War 2. His son, the new King Olav 5, became a flag-bearer of the new era, and a much-respected sovereign. A lot of effort was put into recreating the communities in the northern regions of Troms and Finnmark. The rationing of goods and food lasted for many years. In AD 1949, as a result of the mounting threat of a cold war, Norway became part of NATO and established a close connection to the western powers.

The post-war mixed economy was a system where the workers, the state, and the capital owners were more equal partners. The industrial activity increased significantly, and more and more people moved from the countryside to the cities. The number of people working in agriculture and commercial fishing went from 42% to 15%. The new era heralded a great shift, where Norway went from being mainly a rural society, to having an urban majority.

Did you see this one?
Norway | the last workhorse at Sandaker farm

The emerging welfare state offered child support, sick pay, free public health services, improved social services, unemployment benefits, and much more. Housing quality and the social living standards improved significantly, and schooling was geared up for a prosperous future.

The discovery of oil outside Norway’s long-stretched coastline in the late 1960s, paired with Norway’s focus on national control over and ownership of its natural resources, gave a massive boost to the Norwegian economy in the decades that followed. Instead of lining the pockets of the rich capital owners, a large portion of the wealth was shared by the entire population.

Next period: Norwegian history | transformation and neoliberalism | Norway

Or see the full: History timeline | from stone age to modern era | Norway

BC = before Christ | AD = anno domini = after Christ
Main source: Store norske leksikon – snl.no

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