Norwegian history | the post World War 2 era | Norway

After the end of World War 2, the Norwegians all took part in lifting their country well and truly into the 20th century.
LA Dahlmann | talk NORWAY
King Olav V of Norway inspecting the cows. Ekeberg, Oslo in 1959. | Photo: Leif Ørnelund - digitaltmuseum.no OB.Ø59_1527b - CC BY-SA.
King Olav V of Norway inspecting the troops. Ekeberg, Oslo in 1959. | Photo: Leif Ørnelund – Oslo Museum cc by-sa.

The post World War 2 era | AD 1945 – 1970

A post-war bipartisan spirit and communal energy lifted Norway into a whole new level of activity and development. The labour party – Arbeiderpartiet – governed for 20 of the 25 following years. The labour movement was instrumental in creating the modern-day welfare state that Norway is so renowned for today.

King Haakon 7 passed away in AD 1957, a hero from both the events in AD 1905, and for his role as a beacon of hope during World War 2. His son, the new King Olav 5, became a flag-bearer of the new era, and a much-respected sovereign. A lot of effort was put into recreating the communities in the northern regions of Troms and Finnmark. The rationing of goods and food lasted for many years. In AD 1949, as a result of the mounting threat of a cold war, Norway became part of NATO and established a close connection to the western powers.

The post-war mixed economy was a system where the workers, the state, and the capital owners were more equal partners. The industrial activity increased significantly, and more and more people moved from the countryside to the cities. The number of people working in agriculture and commercial fishing went from 42% to 15%. The new era heralded a great shift, where Norway went from being mainly a rural society, to having an urban majority.

Did you see this one?
Norway | the last workhorse at Sandaker farm

The emerging welfare state offered child support, sick pay, free public health services, improved social services, unemployment benefits, and much more. Housing quality and the social living standards improved significantly, and schooling was geared up for a prosperous future.

The discovery of oil outside Norway’s long-stretched coastline in the late 1960s, paired with Norway’s focus on national control over and ownership of its natural resources, gave a massive boost to the Norwegian economy in the decades that followed. Instead of lining the pockets of the rich capital owners, a large portion of the wealth was shared by the entire population.

Next period: Norwegian history | transformation and neoliberalism | Norway

Or see the full: History timeline | from stone age to modern era | Norway

BC = before Christ | AD = anno domini = after Christ
Main source: Store norske leksikon – snl.no

Our most recent posts

My Norwegian heritage

Once you start taking an interest in the old Norwegian farming and family history, then the people of the past start coming to the fore.
The horse no longer roams wild in the Norwegian landscape. But it still has an important place in the Norwegian psyche.
For the old Norwegians, making butter was simply a way of preserving the fresh summer milk - turning it into a type of food that could be stored.
A kipe is a tall, woven basket, often made of twigs from the birch tree. It was carried on the back, and typically used when carrying loads in a landscape full of steep fields and paths.
On 9 April 1940, German forces attacked Norway in the early hours of the morning. The Norwegian armed forces attempted to stave off the attack, but they were in no way prepared for this monumental task.
From the early 1800s and well into the 1900s, Norway was a significant exporter of natural ice. But how did they prevent the ice from melting?
The Stone age people were master hunters, fishers, and gatherers. The lived with the seasons and followed the prey.
In the olden days, people dressed up warmly and got out onto the fjord or lake to catch their Sunday dinner. Enjoy!
Langfjordbotn - in Norway’s northernmost region Finnmark - was the birthplace of Oluf Røde, born in 1889.
The traditional Sami houses, the goahti, were in use until well into our own time. Anders Larsen tells us how he remembers them from the coastal Sami communities in northern Norway.
Mead and beer are both alcoholic drinks known from Norwegian history. The Norwegians call them «mjød» and «øl». But do you know the difference between the two?
Here is a collection of some wonderful vintage photos, showing a handful of Norwegians and their lives.
To make sure he could tide the animals over the long and cold winter, the historical Norwegian farmer utilised all available resources.
On 18 November 1905, after a supportive referendum, the Norwegian parliament unanimously elected the Danish Prince Carl as the country’s new king.
When the ice melted after the last ice age, herds of reindeer followed in its wake. And with the animals came their main predator: the humans.
The Black Death – mother of all plagues - ravaged humankind in the mid-1300s. A Norwegian scholar takes us through the lead up to the disaster.
What beautiful needlework. A bonnet from the collections of Slottsfjellsmuseet - in the city of Tønsberg.
Lystring is a Norwegian verb that means catching fish or other water creatures in the dark, using a fire torch to attract the fish and a multi-pronged spear.
For many, it may come as a surprise that the history of rose painting and its place in Norwegian folk art is not as old as one might think.
With the birth of the new Norwegian national state in 1814, came big ideas. And one of them was to establish better transportation systems.
In the coastal districts of the old Norway, a strandsitter was a beach dweller - who rented a small piece of land - but owned the house he built on it. His livelihood was usually connected to the sea.

Follow us on social media

Norwegian history