Norwegian history | the latest ice age | Norway

The land that we call Norway was once covered by a massive sheet of ice. In places, the glaciers were as much as 3,000 metres thick.
LA Dahlmann | talk NORWAY
Woolly mammoths. | © Daniel - stock.adobe.com.
Woolly mammoths. | © Daniel - stock.adobe.com.

The latest ice age | 115,000 – 10,000 BC

Over the last 2.5 million years, there have been as many as 30 ice ages. The latest period stretched between 115,000 and 10,000 BC. The glaciers were like gigantic, slow-moving bulldozers, completely transforming the underlying rock formations; creating the fjords, the mountain peaks, the valleys, and so much more of what is the Norwegian landscape today.

During the ice age, there were long intermittent stages when the ice melted, and flora and fauna returned. Such milder periods could last for centuries. Norwegian archaeologists have found remains of both the mammoth and the woolly rhinoceros dating back to this time.

With the end of the latest ice age – some 12,000 years ago – came the beginning of time; the beginning of human history in this part of the world.

Norwegian history timeline

  1. The latest ice age
    115,000-10,000 BC
  2. The Stone age
    10,000-1800 BC
  3. The Bronze age
    1800-500 BC
  4. The Iron age
    500 BC-AD 1050
  5. The High middle ages
    AD 1050-1350
  6. The Late middle ages
    AD 1350-1537
  7. The Early modern period
    AD 1537-1814
  8. Norway reborn as a sovereign state
    AD 1814
  9. Norway in union with Sweden
    AD 1814-1905
  10. Full independence at last
    AD 1905
  11. Prosperity, war and depression
    AD 1905-1940
  12. World War 2 and occupation
    AD 1940-1945
  13. The post World War 2 era
    AD 1945-1970
  14. Transformation and neoliberalism
    AD 1970-1990
  15. Technology and globalisation
    AD 1990-today

BC = before Christ | AD = anno domini = after Christ
Main source: Store norske leksikon – snl.no

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