Norwegian history | the latest ice age | Norway

The land that we call Norway was once covered by a massive sheet of ice. In places, the glaciers were as much as 3,000 metres thick.
Woolly mammoths. | © Daniel - stock.adobe.com.
Woolly mammoths. | © Daniel - stock.adobe.com.

The latest ice age | 115,000 – 10,000 BC

Over the last 2.5 million years, there have been as many as 30 ice ages. The latest period stretched between 115,000 and 10,000 BC. The glaciers were like gigantic, slow-moving bulldozers, completely transforming the underlying rock formations; creating the fjords, the mountain peaks, the valleys, and so much more of what is the Norwegian landscape today.

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During the ice age, there were long intermittent stages when the ice melted, and flora and fauna returned. Such milder periods could last for centuries. Norwegian archaeologists have found remains of both the mammoth and the woolly rhinoceros dating back to this time.

With the end of the latest ice age – some 12,000 years ago – came the beginning of time; the beginning of human history in this part of the world.

Next period: Norwegian history | the Stone age | Norway

Or see the full: History timeline | from stone age to modern era | Norway

BC = before Christ | AD = anno domini = after Christ
Main source: Store norske leksikon – snl.no

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