Norwegian history | the Bronze age | Norway

With the Bronze age came a new and important phase in human history and development: mankind learned how to make tools and other objects from a metal they called bronze.
LA Dahlmann | talk NORWAY
Bronze age objects. | Photo: Eirik Irgens Johnsen - Kulturhistorisk museum UiO cc by-sa.
Bronze age objects. | Photo: Eirik Irgens Johnsen - Kulturhistorisk museum UiO cc by-sa.

The Bronze age | 1800 – 500 BC

The main building blocks of bronze – copper and tin – are naturally rare in the Norwegian landscape. Therefore, the number of bronze objects found by Norwegian archaeologists is relatively small.

During the Bronze age, the difference between the farmers and the hunter-gatherers became more defined. External influence kept coming in, from what today is Denmark and Europe to the south, and Russia and Finland to the north-east.

It is in this era, that the Sami hunter-gatherer culture emerges. Rock carvings from the Bronze age give us information about people’s way of life and spiritual beliefs.

Norwegian history timeline

  1. The latest ice age
    115,000-10,000 BC
  2. The Stone age
    10,000-1800 BC
  3. The Bronze age
    1800-500 BC
  4. The Iron age
    500 BC-AD 1050
  5. The High middle ages
    AD 1050-1350
  6. The Late middle ages
    AD 1350-1537
  7. The Early modern period
    AD 1537-1814
  8. Norway reborn as a sovereign state
    AD 1814
  9. Norway in union with Sweden
    AD 1814-1905
  10. Full independence at last
    AD 1905
  11. Prosperity, war and depression
    AD 1905-1940
  12. World War 2 and occupation
    AD 1940-1945
  13. The post World War 2 era
    AD 1945-1970
  14. Transformation and neoliberalism
    AD 1970-1990
  15. Technology and globalisation
    AD 1990-today

BC = before Christ | AD = anno domini = after Christ
Main source: Store norske leksikon – snl.no

Advertisement

End of advertisement

Our most recent posts

Advertisement

End of advertisement

My Norwegian heritage

Skigard is a Norwegian noun that means wooden fence. It is made of split tree trunks, using simple tools. Fence making and mending was a task for early summer.
It was midsummer 1895. An older man was found drifting in the fjord just outside Moss, Norway - shot in the temple with a revolver. Who was he?
Some vintage photos - and more to come.
With the High middle ages came expansion and progress. But everything was about to change, in the most brutal way imaginable.
A primstav is an old wooden calendar-stick, marking the days of the year and important events. It splits the year into two equal halves: summer and winter.
A kjenge is a drinking bowl used in the old Norwegian farming society – usually with two handles - carved and hollowed out from one piece of wood.
Myrmelk is a Norwegian noun that means milk conserved in a container buried in a mountain peat bog, left there for herders or others to drink at a later stage.
In this selection of beautiful hand-coloured lantern slides from around 1900, we visit the city of Bergen - and other west coast destinations. Enjoy!
For more than a thousand years, Norwegian farmers sent their livestock to feed in the forests and the mountains. Today, this way of life has almost disappeared.
Here are 12 historical photos representing the fascinating Sami culture - with deep roots in the Norwegian and Nordic landscape.
After the end of World War 2, the Norwegians all took part in lifting their country well and truly into the 20th century.
Magne Løvstuen and his family adopted this moose calf after saving it from drowning in Lake Mjøsa.
This is our second video-slideshow with vintage photos of the Norwegian farm horse. Enjoy!
In this post you will find a list of Norway’s 15 main historical eras - from the ice age to our modern day.
On 9 April 1940, German forces attacked Norway in the early hours of the morning. The Norwegian armed forces attempted to stave off the attack, but they were in no way prepared for this monumental task.
One of the oldest Norwegian instruments is the birch trumpet. But is it really an instrument at all - or did it originally have a completely different purpose?
Here is a collection of some wonderful vintage photos, showing a handful of Norwegians and their lives.
In the year AD 1537, King Christian 3 of Denmark-Norway embraced the Lutheran Reformation, and the Norwegians went from being Catholics to Protestants. The king confiscated the Catholic Church’s considerable wealth, a welcomed addition to the royal coffers. Norway more or less ceased to exist as a sovereign state and became a province under Denmark.
On the historical Norwegian farm, winter feed for the domesticated animals was a precious resource. Sometimes it was harvested and temporarily stored far away from the farm.
At Easter in 1906, renowned Norwegian photographer Anders Beer Wilse took this series of photos on a trip with a group of friends.
The Norwegians rarely allow alien species into their fauna. With one notable exception, the muskox - first welcomed in from Greenland in 1924.

Follow us on social media

Norwegian history