Norwegian history | the Bronze age | Norway

With the Bronze age came a new and important phase in human history and development: mankind learned how to make tools and other objects from a metal they called bronze.
LA Dahlmann | talk NORWAY
Bronze age objects. | Photo: Eirik Irgens Johnsen - Kulturhistorisk museum UiO cc by-sa.
Bronze age objects. | Photo: Eirik Irgens Johnsen - Kulturhistorisk museum UiO cc by-sa.

The Bronze age | 1800 – 500 BC

The main building blocks of bronze – copper and tin – are naturally rare in the Norwegian landscape. Therefore, the number of bronze objects found by Norwegian archaeologists is relatively small.

During the Bronze age, the difference between the farmers and the hunter-gatherers became more defined. External influence kept coming in, from what today is Denmark and Europe to the south, and Russia and Finland to the north-east.

It is in this era, that the Sami hunter-gatherer culture emerges. Rock carvings from the Bronze age give us information about people’s way of life and spiritual beliefs.

Norwegian history timeline

  1. The latest ice age
    115,000-10,000 BC
  2. The Stone age
    10,000-1800 BC
  3. The Bronze age
    1800-500 BC
  4. The Iron age
    500 BC-AD 1050
  5. The High middle ages
    AD 1050-1350
  6. The Late middle ages
    AD 1350-1537
  7. The Early modern period
    AD 1537-1814
  8. Norway reborn as a sovereign state
    AD 1814
  9. Norway in union with Sweden
    AD 1814-1905
  10. Full independence at last
    AD 1905
  11. Prosperity, war and depression
    AD 1905-1940
  12. World War 2 and occupation
    AD 1940-1945
  13. The post World War 2 era
    AD 1945-1970
  14. Transformation and neoliberalism
    AD 1970-1990
  15. Technology and globalisation
    AD 1990-today

BC = before Christ | AD = anno domini = after Christ
Main source: Store norske leksikon – snl.no

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Norwegian history