Norwegian history | the Bronze age | Norway

With the Bronze age came a new and important phase in human history and development: mankind learned how to make tools and other objects from a metal they called bronze.
LA Dahlmann | talk NORWAY
Bronze age objects. | Photo: Eirik Irgens Johnsen - Kulturhistorisk museum UiO cc by-sa.
Bronze age objects. | Photo: Eirik Irgens Johnsen - Kulturhistorisk museum UiO cc by-sa.

The Bronze age | 1800 – 500 BC

The main building blocks of bronze – copper and tin – are naturally rare in the Norwegian landscape. Therefore, the number of bronze objects found by Norwegian archaeologists is relatively small.

During the Bronze age, the difference between the farmers and the hunter-gatherers became more defined. External influence kept coming in, from what today is Denmark and Europe to the south, and Russia and Finland to the north-east.

It is in this era, that the Sami hunter-gatherer culture emerges. Rock carvings from the Bronze age give us information about people’s way of life and spiritual beliefs.

Norwegian history timeline

  1. The latest ice age
    115,000-10,000 BC
  2. The Stone age
    10,000-1800 BC
  3. The Bronze age
    1800-500 BC
  4. The Iron age
    500 BC-AD 1050
  5. The High middle ages
    AD 1050-1350
  6. The Late middle ages
    AD 1350-1537
  7. The Early modern period
    AD 1537-1814
  8. Norway reborn as a sovereign state
    AD 1814
  9. Norway in union with Sweden
    AD 1814-1905
  10. Full independence at last
    AD 1905
  11. Prosperity, war and depression
    AD 1905-1940
  12. World War 2 and occupation
    AD 1940-1945
  13. The post World War 2 era
    AD 1945-1970
  14. Transformation and neoliberalism
    AD 1970-1990
  15. Technology and globalisation
    AD 1990-today

BC = before Christ | AD = anno domini = after Christ
Main source: Store norske leksikon – snl.no

Our most recent posts

My Norwegian heritage

When the ice melted after the last ice age, herds of reindeer followed in its wake. And with the animals came their main predator: the humans.
In the olden days, people dressed up warmly and got out onto the fjord or lake to catch their Sunday dinner. Enjoy!
A photo is a snapshot of history - and a story and a history lesson in itself.
In this post you will find a list of Norway’s 15 main historical eras - from the ice age to our modern day.
In olden Norway, the farm-animals were sent off to the mountains and forests all summer. With them came a herder to guard them, and a maid to turn their milk into cheese and butter.
Uekte and ekte are Norwegian adjectives that in one context means illegitimate and legitimate - as in a child born outside or inside a marriage.
When humankind first appeared in the Norwegian landscape – sometime after the last ice age – the search for food was their primary motivation.
The first Norwegian Buhund breed-standard came in 1926, based on a dog that had evolved, lived, and worked with the Norwegians since time immemorial.
Åre is a Norwegian noun that means an open fireplace, placed on the floor in the middle of a room. The smoke goes up and out through a vent in the roof - the ljore.
Folklore and old folk tales often depict The Black Death in the shape of an ashen-faced old woman. Her name was Pesta.
Klippfisk - or klipfish - is fish preserved through salting and drying. Since the early 1700s, the Norwegians have been large-scale klippfisk producers and exporters.
Skjemat is a Norwegian noun that means food eaten with a spoon - often before or after the main course at dinner. It could be porridge, soup, dessert, and more.
After the end of World War 2, the Norwegians all took part in lifting their country well and truly into the 20th century.
Skårfast is a Norwegian adjective that means that a person or an animal is stuck on a steep mountain- or cliff-side shelf, and in need of being rescued.
The horse settled in the Scandinavian landscape after the last ice age. Let us meet this majestic animal - and follow in its footsteps.
In the old Norwegian farming society, a husmann was a man who was allowed to build his home on a small section of a farm’s land, and pay with his labour instead of rent.
Myrmelk is a Norwegian noun that means milk conserved in a container buried in a mountain peat bog, left there for herders or others to drink at a later stage.
The old Norwegian farm needed hundreds of litres of water every single day: for food-making, cleaning, and human and animal consumption.
The word ski comes from the Old Norse language, with the meaning cleft wood. The old Norwegians were master hunters, and have been skiing for over 5000 years.
Bondegård is a Norwegian noun that means farm. In informal speech and in many dialects, people only use the single word gård or gard.
In 1935, Aslaug Engnæs published a guidance book on how to milk the cow.

Follow us on social media

Norwegian history