Norwegian history | technology and globalisation | Norway

With a growing population and public sector, Norway pushed through significant reforms in several areas: public structure and organisation, welfare, health care, tax, policing, public services, and more.
LA Dahlmann | talk NORWAY
© Natalia Kurzova - stock.adobe.com.
© Natalia Kurzova - stock.adobe.com.

Technology and globalisation | AD 1990 – today

The liberalisation and financial speculation culture of the 1980s led to crash-landings in many sectors. Norway’s oil finances helped ease the transition into a consolidated next phase. A more nuanced concept of liberalism, paired with the core ideas of the earlier regulated society, gave improved and more stable results.

To avoid over-heating the economy, the enormous communal oil wealth was placed in the Government Pension Fund Global, one of the world’s largest investment funds.

When the Norwegians rejected the opportunity to join the EU in AD 1994, the country chose instead to secure its access to the single market through a comprehensive trade agreement. The new millennium brought a digital revolution that transformed everyday life, changing both social behaviour and political participation.

The Norwegians have come a long way since the appearance of the first hunter-gatherers. Still, that early part of history is very much a profound part of the Norwegian spirit – and the Norwegians’ connection to the land, the sea, and the majestic force of the Nordic elements.

See the full: History timeline | from stone age to modern era | Norway

BC = before Christ | AD = anno domini = after Christ
Main source: Store norske leksikon – snl.no

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My Norwegian heritage

When the ice melted after the last ice age, herds of reindeer followed in its wake. And with the animals came their main predator: the humans.
Once upon a time in the distant past, imagine yourself sitting in a small boat, facing this mighty gateway into the bowels of the land.
Do you have trouble sleeping? Here are some examples of how the old Norwegians used Mother Nature’s very own remedies to cure their ailments.
Klippfisk - or klipfish - is fish preserved through salting and drying. Since the early 1700s, the Norwegians have been large-scale klippfisk producers and exporters.
The old Norwegian farming society was a self-sufficient and balanced world. Coins and notes were all but an alien concept.
In Norway, the pizza appeared as an exotic newcomer in the 1970s. But bread topped with foodstuffs is nothing new in Norwegian food history.
On the historical Norwegian farm, the skoklefallsday is the last day of planting in the spring. Literally, it means the day that the shafts attached to the workhorse's harness come off.
The spinning wheel was a lifelong companion for most women in the old Norwegian farming society. Enjoy this video-collection of wonderful vintage photographs.
17 May 1814 is regarded as the birth of the modern-day Norwegian state. But it took almost another hundred years before the Norwegians could declare complete independence.
The first half of the 1900s was a time of enormous change in Norwegian society. It was then that a young boy experienced a peculiar family custom.
The oldest wooden buildings in Norway are almost 1000 years old - like Urnes stave church in Luster. How come these buildings do not rot away and disappear?
Skibladner is one of the world's oldest paddle steamers still in regular service. She was launched in 1856, and sails on Norway's largest lake, Mjøsa.
In 1935, Aslaug Engnæs published a guidance book on how to milk the cow.
The Heddal stave church - stavkirke - is Norway's largest remaining building of its kind. It is a woodwork masterpiece, with a history that stretches back more than 800 years.
Oslo is the capital city of Norway. It was founded in AD 1048 by the Viking king Harald Hardråde. Historically, the city is also known as Christiania or Kristiania.
The Stone age people were master hunters, fishers, and gatherers. The lived with the seasons and followed the prey.
Like all buildings on the old Norwegian farm, the stabbur had a clear purpose: it was a building designed for the storage of food.
This is our second video-slideshow with vintage photos of the Norwegian farm horse. Enjoy!
Magne Løvstuen and his family adopted this moose calf after saving it from drowning in Lake Mjøsa.
In my childhood, life was simple. And the small joys of Christmas lifted our spirits - and delivered us safely into the new year.
Watch some lovely vintage photos of mankinds's many good friends.

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Norwegian history