Norway | the two Trøndelag counties have merged

As a first such an event in modern times: the Norwegian counties Sør-Trøndelag and Nord-Trøndelag have now merged.
LA Dahlmann | talk NORWAY
The Nidaros cathedral - Trondheim. | Copyright: alexpermyakov - fotolia.
The Nidaros cathedral - Trondheim. | Copyright: alexpermyakov - fotolia.

A historic day

27 April 2016 was an important day in the history of the local self-government structure of Norway: the two counties Sør-Trøndelag and Nord-Trøndelag decided to merge.

The two county assemblies – fylkestingene – made the landmark decision in a parallel session at the historic location of Stiklestad. Sør-Trøndelag voted 41 for and 2 against – Nord-Trøndelag voted 21 for and 14 against.

The name of the new county will be Trøndelag. The change was approved by the Norwegian Government 20 May 2016 and took effect from 1 January 2018.

When Prime minister Erna Solberg and her conservative government took office in October 2013, they embarked on a gradual journey attempting to simplify the Norwegian county and municipality structure. Their aim is to create a leaner and more efficient organisation for the future.

Per 2016 there are 19 counties and 428 municipalities. Norway’s smallest municipality is Utsira in Rogaland with only 200 inhabitants. The goal is to reduce the number of counties to 10 – and to reduce the number of municipalities significantly. Trøndelag’s decision is likely to have a major impact on the debate going forward.

The Solberg government’s approach has been that of a voluntary change – something which has proven difficult. Through local referendums, many municipalities have rejected a merger with neighbouring entities.

Trøndelag

Trøndelag is the middle region of the long-stretched land of Norway – a region with deep historic roots. It is called home by around 445 000 people.

Among so many other things, Trøndelag is known for its beautiful, undulating landscape, its dialect and its large, lush strawberries.

Trondheim will be the new political centre

It is expected that Trondheim will be the political centre of the new county. The administrative organisation – with its administrative leader, the fylkesmann – is expected to reside in the city of Steinkjer.

Trondheim is home to the beautiful Nidaros cathedral, Nidarosdomen. The cathedral is the grave church of St. Olav – the patron saint of Norway – and it was built between 1070 and 1300. In addition to being a historical and current pilgrim-walk destination, it is also the location for previous royal coronations – and more recently, royal blessings.

King Haakon and Queen Maud were crowned at Nidaros in 1906 – King Olav was blessed there in 1958 – and King Harald and Queen Sonja received their blessing in 1991.

Trondheim is also the hometown of Liv Ullmann – renowned actor and Ingmar Bergmann muse. For those interested in emigration history, talknorway.no strongly recommends the Swedish masterpiece «The emigrants» starring Liv Ullman and Max Von Sydow from 1971. The film depicts the life of Swedish emigrants but will have many similarities to the life of those emigrating from Norway (Swedish with English sub-titles).

Main sources: Trønder-Avisa t-a.no | vg.no | wikipedia.org.

Our most recent posts

My Norwegian heritage

A primstav is an old wooden calendar-stick, marking the days of the year and important events. It splits the year into two equal halves: summer and winter.
Norway is a land of water, with almost 1 million lakes and ponds of all sizes. Join us in exploring the 5 largest of her lakes, and some more Norway facts.
Old objects tell stories, silent stories about a time gone by.
A loved child goes by many names, says a Norwegian expression. This certainly applies to the country Norway. But what does the name really mean?
The old Norwegian farm needed hundreds of litres of water every single day: for food-making, cleaning, and human and animal consumption.
At Easter in 1906, renowned Norwegian photographer Anders Beer Wilse took this series of photos on a trip with a group of friends.
A kjenge is a drinking bowl used in the old Norwegian farming society – usually with two handles - carved and hollowed out from one piece of wood.
Carl Fredrik Sundt-Hansen created this fascinating oil painting in 1904. It is like a window leading into the house of history. If only we could climb through.
Norway’s full independence came in AD 1905, and was the culmination of a process that had lasted for several decades.
The Norwegian landscape is wild and beautiful. And it is a lot more than just fjords and mountains.
In 1942, Hans Hyldbakk wrote the history of the local cotter's holdings in Surnadal, Nordmøre, Norway. The book was updated in 1966.
It was midsummer 1895. An older man was found drifting in the fjord just outside Moss, Norway - shot in the temple with a revolver. Who was he?
On the historical Norwegian farm, winter feed for the domesticated animals was a precious resource. Sometimes it was harvested and temporarily stored far away from the farm.
Magne Løvstuen and his family adopted this moose calf after saving it from drowning in Lake Mjøsa.
The most significant sections of Norwegian productive soil can be found in the counties of Trøndelag, Hedmark, Oppland and Rogaland.
In Norway, the first traces of iron date back to 400-300 BC. The country has significant iron resources, and making tools and weapons from this new metal was a significant step forward.
The word ski comes from the Old Norse language, with the meaning cleft wood. The old Norwegians were master hunters, and have been skiing for over 5000 years.
Here are 12 historical photos representing the fascinating Sami culture - with deep roots in the Norwegian and Nordic landscape.
Skårfast is a Norwegian adjective that means that a person or an animal is stuck on a steep mountain- or cliff-side shelf, and in need of being rescued.
Uekte and ekte are Norwegian adjectives that in one context means illegitimate and legitimate - as in a child born outside or inside a marriage.
Some vintage photos - and more to come.

Follow us on social media

Norwegian history