Kjenge | wooden drinking bowl | Norway

A kjenge is a drinking bowl used in the old Norwegian farming society – usually with two handles - carved and hollowed out from one piece of wood.
Norwegian drinking vessel – a kjenge. From Atrå, Tinn, Telemark. | Photo: Jon-Erik Faksvaag – digitaltmuseum.no NF.2010-0506 – CC BY-SA.
Photo: Norwegian drinking vessel – a kjenge. From Atrå, Tinn, Telemark. | Photo: Jon-Erik Faksvaag – Norsk Folkemuseum cc by-sa.

Pronunciation

Kjenge

The kjenge is predominantly used for drinking beer. It is usually round, whereas the kane has a more elongated shape, like a ship. The word kane is related to old words meaning boat. In Norwegian, kane can also mean sleigh. The bowl’s handles usually have a human or animal shape.

It is often carved from what the Norwegians call a kåte, a knot or protuberance on a tree. The wood in a kåte is harder than normal and is a sought-after material by wood carvers. This is the kind of object the old Norwegian farmer would work on around the fire – during the long and dark winter evenings.

Norwegian drinking vessel - a kjenge. From Voss, Hordaland. Made in 1755. | Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfeldt - digitaltmuseum.no NF.2010-0504 - CC BY-SA.

Norwegian drinking vessel – a kjenge. From Voss, Hordaland. Made in 1755. | Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfeldt – digitaltmuseum.no NF.2010-0504 – CC BY-SA.

Main source: «Norske drikkekar av tre» by Per Gjærder – Universitetsforlaget 1974.

Our most recent posts
Norway time
The Kingdom of Norway
Some of the beautiful Norwegian wooden stave churches are almost 1000 years old. Today, there are 28 of them left.
Here is a collection of some wonderful vintage photos, showing a handful of Norwegians and their lives.
Our foremothers were hardworking and inventive. Here you can read more about how the laundry was done on a Norwegian mountain farm in the late 1800s.
In 1836, milkmaid Kari Moen from the community of Sauherad in Telemark, Norway, was attacked by a bear. She almost lost her life that day.
Skårfast is a Norwegian adjective that means that a person or an animal is stuck on a steep mountain- or cliff-side shelf, and in need of being rescued.
Skjemat is a Norwegian noun that means food eaten with a spoon - often before or after the main course at dinner. It could be porridge, soup, dessert, and more.
In 1997, His Majesty King Harald V of Norway came to the Norwegian Sami Assembly with an essential and overdue apology.
Per O. Rød wrote the history of the Stornæve farm and its inhabitants back in 1968. Decades earlier, several children of Stornæve had emigrated to the US.
In Norway, the first traces of iron date back to 400-300 BC. The country has significant iron resources, and making tools and weapons from this new metal was a significant step forward.
The most significant sections of Norwegian productive soil can be found in the counties of Trøndelag, Hedmark, Oppland and Rogaland.
On the historical Norwegian farm, winter feed for the domesticated animals was a precious resource. Sometimes it was harvested and temporarily stored far away from the farm.
When I was a boy, it was the workhorse that pulled the heaviest weight in agricultural life. And this had been the reality for as long as anyone could remember.
When the industrial revolution brought machinery to the Norwegian farms, it didn't just change the old working methods, it also changed the layout and look of the farmland.
On an island in the Arctic Ocean, deep inside a permafrost mountain, we find a treasure trove of food-plant seeds: the Svalbard Global Seed Vault.
At Easter in 1906, renowned Norwegian photographer Anders Beer Wilse took this series of photos on a trip with a group of friends.
The hour of twilight is when the daylight starts to disappear – before it is completely dark. In the old Norwegian farming society, this was a time for rest.
17 May 1814 is regarded as the birth of the modern-day Norwegian state. But it took almost another hundred years before the Norwegians could declare complete independence.
Whether it be on a rainy day - or a beautiful summer’s day like this one - the coastal paths take us through some pleasing stretches of Norwegian scenery.
Once upon a time in the distant past, imagine yourself sitting in a small boat, facing this mighty gateway into the bowels of the land.
The land that we call Norway was once covered by a massive sheet of ice. In places, the glaciers were as much as 3,000 metres thick.
The oldest wooden buildings in Norway are almost 1000 years old - like Urnes stave church in Luster. How come these buildings do not rot away and disappear?

Follow us on social media