Kjenge | wooden drinking bowl | Norway

A kjenge is a drinking bowl used in the old Norwegian farming society – usually with two handles - carved and hollowed out from one piece of wood.
LA Dahlmann | talk NORWAY
Norwegian drinking vessel – a kjenge. From Atrå, Tinn, Telemark. | Photo: Jon-Erik Faksvaag – digitaltmuseum.no NF.2010-0506 – CC BY-SA.
Photo: Norwegian drinking vessel – a kjenge. From Atrå, Tinn, Telemark. | Photo: Jon-Erik Faksvaag – Norsk Folkemuseum cc by-sa.

Pronunciation

Kjenge

The kjenge is predominantly used for drinking beer. It is usually round, whereas the kane has a more elongated shape, like a ship. The word kane is related to old words meaning boat. In Norwegian, kane can also mean sleigh. The bowl’s handles usually have a human or animal shape.

It is often carved from what the Norwegians call a kåte, a knot or protuberance on a tree. The wood in a kåte is harder than normal and is a sought-after material by wood carvers. This is the kind of object the old Norwegian farmer would work on around the fire – during the long and dark winter evenings.

Norwegian drinking vessel - a kjenge. From Voss, Hordaland. Made in 1755. | Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfeldt - digitaltmuseum.no NF.2010-0504 - CC BY-SA.

Norwegian drinking vessel – a kjenge. From Voss, Hordaland. Made in 1755. | Photo: Anne-Lise Reinsfeldt – digitaltmuseum.no NF.2010-0504 – CC BY-SA.

Main source: «Norske drikkekar av tre» by Per Gjærder – Universitetsforlaget 1974.

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