Kipe | means a basket in Norwegian | Norway

A kipe is a tall, woven basket, often made of twigs from the birch tree. It was carried on the back, and typically used when carrying loads in a landscape full of steep fields and paths.
LA Dahlmann | talk NORWAY
An unnamed man with a kipe full of turf for the fire. Taken on the island of Dønna in 1967. | Photo: Jac Brun - Mittet & Co. AS cc pdm.
An unnamed man with a kipe full of turf for the fire. Taken on the island of Dønna in 1967. | Photo: Jac Brun - Mittet & Co. AS cc pdm.

Pronunciation

Kipe

The grammar

Noun | both masculine and feminine, depending on the dialect | the indefinite form: en/ei kipe (a kipe) | the definite form: kipen/kipa (the kipe).

What does the word mean?

A kipe is a woven basket, sometimes with a flat, wooden bottom to make it more robust. It was usually carried like a backpack, or with one strap held over the shoulder. Two baskets could also be carried using a yoke.

Similar or related word

Kurv: has a similar meaning.

More on the historical context

A useful tool

Norway is a land full of steep hills and mountains. Historically, there were few roads, only meandering paths through the landscape. Whenever you wanted to transport something – unless you had a packhorse – you had to carry it on your back. A robust basket – a kipe – was a highly useful tool for this purpose.

For so many purposes

The kipe was used to carry fish from your boat, to move the animal manure from the barn to the fields in the early spring, to carry wood or turf for the fire, to carry a baby, and much, much more.

Examples from books and stories

Arne Lie Christensen Sidl og pote: daglegliv i ei strilebygd slik folk minnest 1990
→ Enkelte heldt fram som før med å bera ut møka i kipe.
→ Some people continued the old tradition of carrying out the animal manure onto the meadows using a kipe.

Solveig Nes Oppvekst ved havet: levekår i eit øysamfunn i Sunnfjord 2000
→ Ho bar gjerne den minste med seg i ei kipe når ho arbeidde ute.
→ When working outdoors, she usually carried the youngest child in a kipe on her back.

Sources: Nasjonalbiblioteket nb.no | Einar Haugen’s Norwegian-English dictionary | Det Norske Akademis ordbok | Bokmålsordboka and Nynorskordboka.

Our most recent posts

My Norwegian heritage

Old objects tell stories, silent stories about a time gone by.
With the Bronze age came a new and important phase in human history and development: mankind learned how to make tools and other objects from a metal they called bronze.
In this post you will find a list of Norway’s 15 main historical eras - from the ice age to our modern day.
This is our second video-slideshow with vintage photos of the Norwegian farm horse. Enjoy!
A primstav is an old wooden calendar-stick, marking the days of the year and important events. It splits the year into two equal halves: summer and winter.
17 May 1814 is regarded as the birth of the modern-day Norwegian state. But it took almost another hundred years before the Norwegians could declare complete independence.
Norway's mainland coastline, with its many fjords and islands, is the second longest in the world - next only to Canada. Here are some more facts for you.
Skigard is a Norwegian noun that means wooden fence. It is made of split tree trunks, using simple tools. Fence making and mending was a task for early summer.
The Heddal stave church - stavkirke - is Norway's largest remaining building of its kind. It is a woodwork masterpiece, with a history that stretches back more than 800 years.
Norway’s full independence came in AD 1905, and was the culmination of a process that had lasted for several decades.
The traditional Norwegians are drawn to their cabins, whether it be in the mountains, in the forest, or by the sea. Some would say that they are a people obsessed.
Whether it be on a rainy day - or a beautiful summer’s day like this one - the coastal paths take us through some pleasing stretches of Norwegian scenery.
The traditional Sami houses, the goahti, were in use until well into our own time. Anders Larsen tells us how he remembers them from the coastal Sami communities in northern Norway.
The first half of the 1900s was a time of enormous change in Norwegian society. It was then that a young boy experienced a peculiar family custom.
Åre is a Norwegian noun that means an open fireplace, placed on the floor in the middle of a room. The smoke goes up and out through a vent in the roof - the ljore.
Kantslått is a Norwegian noun that means (1) the grass that is cut along the edges of a field, a road, etc. or (2) the actual process of cutting this grass. Traditionally, the grass was used as animal fodder.
The word ski comes from the Old Norse language, with the meaning cleft wood. The old Norwegians were master hunters, and have been skiing for over 5000 years.
There are many types of cheese slicers, but Norwegian furniture maker Thor Bjørklund invented the Norwegian version in 1925.
In this selection of beautiful hand-coloured lantern slides from around 1900, we visit the city of Bergen - and other west coast destinations. Enjoy!
Oslo is the capital city of Norway. It was founded in AD 1048 by the Viking king Harald Hardråde. Historically, the city is also known as Christiania or Kristiania.
In Scandinavia, agriculture first appeared in the Stone age – around 2400 BC. The early farmers cleared their land by using simple tools and fire.

Follow us on social media

Norwegian history