Ice-fishing | 7 photos to enjoy | Norway

In the olden days, people dressed up warmly and got out onto the fjord or lake to catch their Sunday dinner. Enjoy!
LA Dahlmann | talk NORWAY
Illustration - Norway census 1769
Norwegian ice-fishing i 1902. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse Oslo Museum - digitaltmuseum.no OB.Y1105 - cc by.sa.

Photo 2

«Seriously! Is this all I am getting for my dinner?»

Norwegian ice-fishing i 1902. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse Oslo Museum - digitaltmuseum.no OB.Y1104 - cc by.sa.
Photo: Anders Beer Wilse Oslo Museum – digitaltmuseum.no OB.Y1104 – cc by.sa.

Photo 3

On his way with a clear message from the missus: don’t you come back home until today’s dinner is in the basket. The location is Frognerkilen, Oslo, Norway – and the year is 1908.

On his way with a clear message from the missus: don't you come back home until today's dinner is in the basket. The location is Frognerkilen, Oslo, Norway - and the year is 1908. | Photo: Ander Beer Wilse - digitaltmuseum.no OB.Y1731 - cc by-sa.
Photo: Ander Beer Wilse – digitaltmuseum.no OB.Y1731 – cc by-sa.

Photo 4

«A master at work: watch and learn, my son.» The location is Kongshavn, Oslo, Norway – and the year 1908-1910.

A master at work: watch and learn, my son. The location is Kongshavn, Oslo, Norway - and the year 1908-1910. | Photo: Hermann Christian Neupert - digitaltmuseum.no NF.05271-020 - public domain.
Photo: Hermann Christian Neupert – digitaltmuseum.no NF.05271-020 – public domain.

Photo 5

Ice-fishing in February. Note the coffee pot and the simple camping stove. The location is Bestumkilen, Oslo, Norway – and the year is 1938.

Ice-fishing in February. Note the coffee pot and the simple camping stove. The location is Bestumkilen, Oslo, Norway - and the year is 1938. | Photo: Unknown Oslo Museum - digitaltmuseum.no OB.A13026 - cc by-sa.
Photo: Unknown Oslo Museum – digitaltmuseum.no OB.A13026 – cc by-sa.

Photo 6

Who will get the greatest catch of the day? Ice-fishing on the Oslofjord. The year is 1908.

Who will get the greatest catch of the day? Ice-fishing on the Oslofjord. The year is 1908. | Photo: Anders Beer Wilse - digitaltmuseum.no OB.Y1696 - cc by-sa.
Photo: Anders Beer Wilse – digitaltmuseum.no OB.Y1696 – cc by-sa.

Photo 7

Ice-fishing in the winter-darkness. The location is Jægervatnet, Lyngen, Troms, Norway – 1930-1950.

Ice-fishing in the winter-darkness. The location is Jægervatnet, Lyngen, Troms, Norway - 1930-1950. | Photo: Peter Wessel Zapffe - nb.no - public domain.
Photo: Peter Wessel Zapffe – nb.no – public domain.

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