History timeline | from stone age to modern era | Norway

In this post you will find a list of Norway’s 15 main historical eras - from the ice age to our modern day.
LA Dahlmann | talk NORWAY
The Geiranger fjord, Norway. | © saiko3p - stock.adobe.com.
The Geiranger fjord, Norway. | © saiko3p - stock.adobe.com.

Norway, with its demanding topography and climate, is a gem on the surface of the planet, and a challenge that the early people set out to conquer.

The first people that came to these shores were hunters, fishers, and gatherers. As the millennia passed, and the population grew, the Norwegians also became farmers, and developed an identity and a culture.

Here is a list of the 15 main eras of Norwegian human history. Click to see a brief introduction to each historical period.

  1. The latest ice age
    115,000-10,000 BC
  2. The Stone age
    10,000-1800 BC
  3. The Bronze age
    1800-500 BC
  4. The Iron age
    500 BC-AD 1050
  5. The High middle ages
    AD 1050-1350
  6. The Late middle ages
    AD 1350-1537
  7. The Early modern period
    AD 1537-1814
  8. Norway reborn as a sovereign state
    AD 1814
  9. Norway in union with Sweden
    AD 1814-1905
  10. Full independence at last
    AD 1905
  11. Prosperity, war and depression
    AD 1905-1940
  12. World War 2 and occupation
    AD 1940-1945
  13. The post World War 2 era
    AD 1945-1970
  14. Transformation and neoliberalism
    AD 1970-1990
  15. Technology and globalisation
    AD 1990-today

BC = before Christ | AD = anno domini = after Christ
Main source: Store norske leksikon – snl.no

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Norwegian history