History | old love never dies – 1895 | Norway

Neither the great Atlantic Ocean nor time or social conventions could separate a love that was meant to be.
LA Dahlmann | talk NORWAY
The Norwegian flag and two hands shaped as a heart. | Copyright: vepar5 - fotolia.

«In 1868, a 22-year-old boy from a small cotter’s holding under a farm in Romerike, Norway, emigrated to America.

The main reason for the boy leaving, was that he was in a loving relationship with the farmer’s daughter – a girl the same age as he. Sadly, the girl’s father would not give his blessing to this socially unacceptable liaison.

No one seems to have heard much from the boy until very recently, when he unexpectedly returned to Norway for a short visit.

He has done well for himself in America, and is now a prosperous property owner. Upon his return he was still unmarried – and he likewise found his beloved still unmarried.

The two lovers – no longer so young – are today joined in holy matrimony, and will travel to America in a few days – to live together as man and wife in the man’s second homeland.»

Main source: Moss Avis, 13 Juli 1895.
Main photo: © vepar5 – fotolia.

Our most recent posts

My Norwegian heritage

Old objects tell stories, silent stories about a time gone by.
This beautiful oil painting by Johan Christian Dahl says a lot about generations of Norwegians - and the landscape and the skills they knew.
On 18 November 1905, after a supportive referendum, the Norwegian parliament unanimously elected the Danish Prince Carl as the country’s new king.
The hour of twilight is when the daylight starts to disappear – before it is completely dark. In the old Norwegian farming society, this was a time for rest.
The oldest wooden buildings in Norway are almost 1000 years old - like Urnes stave church in Luster. How come these buildings do not rot away and disappear?
For many, it may come as a surprise that the history of rose painting and its place in Norwegian folk art is not as old as one might think.
Queen Maud of Norway was born in London in 1869, as Princess Maud of Wales. Her grandmother was none other than the formidable Queen Victoria.
The horse no longer roams wild in the Norwegian landscape. But it still has an important place in the Norwegian psyche.
Our foremothers were hardworking and inventive. Here you can read more about how the laundry was done on a Norwegian mountain farm in the late 1800s.
In the year AD 1537, King Christian 3 of Denmark-Norway embraced the Lutheran Reformation, and the Norwegians went from being Catholics to Protestants. The king confiscated the Catholic Church’s considerable wealth, a welcomed addition to the royal coffers. Norway more or less ceased to exist as a sovereign state and became a province under Denmark.
Bergen is Norway's second-largest city and one of the country's oldest urban locations. The first post-viking king, Olav Kyrre, gave it market-town-status around AD 1070.
The old Norwegian farm needed hundreds of litres of water every single day: for food-making, cleaning, and human and animal consumption.
In olden Norway, the farm-animals were sent off to the mountains and forests all summer. With them came a herder to guard them, and a maid to turn their milk into cheese and butter.
There are many types of cheese slicers, but Norwegian furniture maker Thor Bjørklund invented the Norwegian version in 1925.
The Heddal stave church - stavkirke - is Norway's largest remaining building of its kind. It is a woodwork masterpiece, with a history that stretches back more than 800 years.
The Norwegian landscape is wild and beautiful. And it is a lot more than just fjords and mountains.
After the end of World War 2, the Norwegians all took part in lifting their country well and truly into the 20th century.
What beautiful needlework. A bonnet from the collections of Slottsfjellsmuseet - in the city of Tønsberg.
In this selection of beautiful hand-coloured lantern slides from around 1900, we visit the city of Bergen - and other west coast destinations. Enjoy!
Carl Fredrik Sundt-Hansen created this fascinating oil painting in 1904. It is like a window leading into the house of history. If only we could climb through.
Once upon a time in the distant past, imagine yourself sitting in a small boat, facing this mighty gateway into the bowels of the land.

Follow us on social media

Norwegian history